Tag Archives: Fossil of the Week

Wooster’s Fossils of the Week: An oyster reef from the Middle Jurassic of southwestern Utah

It was a pleasure to pull this massive specimen out of the cabinets, where it had been sitting for more than 20 years. It is a small reef of the oyster Liostrea strigilecula (White, 1877) from the Carmel Formation (Middle Jurassic) … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Wooster’s Fossils of the Week: Chaetetids from the Upper Carboniferous of Liaoning Province, North China

Three years ago I had a short and painful trip to China to meet my new colleague and friend Yongli Zhang (Department of Geology, Northeastern University, Shenyang). The China part was great; the pain was from an unfortunately-timed kidney stone … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Wooster’s Fossil of the Week: Predatory trace from the Upper Cretaceous of southwestern France

One hole in a shell is unremarkable. Several in a repeating pattern is a story. Above is a right valve (exterior) of the oyster Pycnodonte vesicularis from the Campanian (Upper Cretaceous) of southwestern France. It was collected during our fantastic … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Wooster’s Fossil of the Week: A rudist clam from the Upper Cretaceous of southwestern France

When we picked up this beautiful fossil in southwestern France this summer, Paul Taylor immediately predicted it would become a Wooster Fossil of the Week. Macy Conrad (’18), Paul and I were on our wonderful expedition in the Type Campanian … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Unknown fossils for the Invertebrate Paleontology class at Wooster

I start my Invertebrate Paleontology classes with an unknown fossil given to each student. I pick something I have enough examples of so that everyone gets the same species. As their first assignment, the students are asked to identify their … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Wooster’s Fossils of the Week: Oysters from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) of southwestern France

Wooster’s Fossil of the Week returns from its summer hiatus. It is appropriate, then, to feature as our first fossil of the new season an oyster species prominent in our summer research. This is Pycnodonte vesicularis (Lamarck, 1806), a very … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Wooster’s Fossils of the Week: A trilobite hypostome with an encrusting cyclostome bryozoan (Upper Ordovician of Kentucky)

A quick post this week. Above is a bit of a large isotelid trilobite my students and I found this past spring break on an expedition to the Upper Ordovician (Katian) of northern Kentucky. It was collected at a roadside outcrop … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Wooster’s Fossils of the Week: A bouquet of barnacles on a pectenid bivalve from the Upper Miocene of Virginia

These beautiful fossils were found in York State Park by Mae Kemsley (’16). It was a surprise gift I found on my doorstep! They are fossil barnacles completely covering the exterior of a valve of the pectenid bivalve Chesapecten middlesexensis … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Wooster’s Fossils of the Week: Belemnites (Jurassic of Wyoming)

This week’s fossils are among the most recognizable. They certainly are popular in my paleontology courses because no one has ever misidentified one. Belemnites (from the Greek belemnon, meaning javelin or dart) were squid-like cephalopods that lived in the Jurassic … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Wooster’s Fossil of the Week: a medullosalean pteridosperm (Upper Carboniferous of northeastern Ohio)

It is time we had another fossil plant in this series. The above specimen is Neuropteris ovata Hoffmann 1826, a relatively common bit of foliage in the Upper Carboniferous of North America. This is a pteridosperm, more commonly known as … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments