Author Archives: acrawford

About acrawford

Alex Crawford is a climate scientist whose specialties include the development of Arctic storm systems, the seasonality of Arctic sea ice, and the interactions between sea ice, storm systems, and the Arctic Ocean. He primarily works with observational data (e.g., from satellites, weather stations, and compilations like atmospheric reanalyses) but also works with output from climate models.

Anatomy of a Record High

Like several towns and cities in the midwest and northeast USA, Wooster, OH broke its daily high temperature record for January 11 last Saturday. Below is a graph of some of the data (made a little prettier in powerpoint) from … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Wooster Records Wettest Year on Record

Last year around this time, I reported on this blog that Wooster had just completed its third wettest year on record. A year later, the “wettest year” record has been broken. With continuous record-keeping beginning in 1900 at the OARDC weather … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 7 Comments

Drought in Zimbabwe and Other Climate Woes

One of my colleagues shared this article from Truthout with me because the title was about how Alaska has no sea ice within 150 miles of its coastline for the first time in recorded history of Alaskan sea ice. That’s … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Two Records in Arctic Melt This Summer

There is perhaps a bit too much media hype about July 2019 being the warmest month on record. If you go to the source — the European Copernicus Climate Service article,  the official statement is that “July 2019 was on a … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Shamrock Glacier, Neacola Mountains, Alaska

While in the Neacola Mountains of Alaska last month, we flew over Shamrock Glacier. This first image is from the head of the glacier, where crevasses have been filled in with snow during the accumulation season. Farther down the north-flowing … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Constructive & Destructive Landforms at Mount Rainier National Park

One common frame used to introduce landforms in introductory Geology courses is the idea of constructive and destructive forces that create and change them. (See, for example some K-12 resources here and here.) Constructive processes like the the deposition of sediment and … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lots of Rain v. Many Rainy Days

The other day while on the phone with my sister, she complained about how bad the weather was. “It’s rained like every day since April 1st” was the statement. That was an exaggeration, so she then modified that statement to … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

Sometimes a Cold Snap is Just a Cold Snap

On Wednesday, January 30, 2019, The College Wooster closed due to cold. This cold snap was felt across much of the central and eastern USA. The message Wooster staff and faculty received included this statement: “The National Weather Service is … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 5 Comments

The Everglades Are All About Geology

If you’ve ever been to the Everglades or even heard of them, you probably are picturing something like this: Or maybe this: In other words, Everglades National Park exists because it is “important habitat for numerous rare and endangered species” … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

New Impact Crater Discovered Under Greenland

If you’re plugged into science news outlets, you’ve likely seen stories about a very large crater that has been detected underneath Hiawatha Glacier in northwest Greenland (e.g., at Science News).  Here’s the link to the peer-reviewed article in Science Advances, by … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 7 Comments