The wondrous Burgess Shale

August 7th, 2009

FIELD, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA–I stepped on Paleontological Holy Ground when I visited the Burgess Shale earlier this week. It is often cited as the most important fossil locality ever. I felt the historical as well as the scientific vibrations in the Walcott Quarry, the site where the extraordinary Charles Walcott began his explorations of the unit in 1909.

The Walcott Quarry of the Burgess Shale.

The Walcott Quarry of the Burgess Shale.

There are numerous websites illustrating the famous Burgess Shale Fauna. I’ll just share some of the favorite fossils I found. (We could pick up and examine any fossil, but collecting, of course, is strictly forbidden.)

The humble sponge Vauxia. I like the less charismatic taxa in the Burgess Shale. The fancy arthropods get plenty of love!

The humble sponge Vauxia. I like the less charismatic taxa in the Burgess Shale. The fancy arthropods get plenty of love!

The primitive mollusc Scenella on the left and a trilobite on the right. The Burgess Shale fauna has plenty of skeletonized fauna along with the soft-bodied forms.

The primitive mollusc Scenella on the left and a trilobite on the right. The Burgess Shale fauna has plenty of skeletonized fauna along with the soft-bodied forms.

This is an odd breccia at the base of the Burgess Shale. The white parts are limestone fragments and the black is calcite. This may be an indication of carbonate hardgrounds -- features I study.

This is an odd breccia at the base of the Burgess Shale. The white parts are limestone fragments and the black is calcite. This may be an indication of carbonate hardgrounds -- features I study.

It is a tradition among paleontologists to pose with Charles Walcott at his famous quarry! I lack the knickers, though.

It is a tradition among paleontologists to formally pose with Charles Walcott at his famous quarry. I lack the knickers, though, and that certain set of jaw.

The Walcott Quarry of the Burgess Shale on a beautiful day

August 6th, 2009

FIELD, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA–We have a small group of seven people for this expedition organized by Matthew James of Sonoma State University in California. Everyone is from California except me (although I was invited through my California roots). Our guide to the Walcott Quarry didn’t show up yesterday morning, so we joined a much larger group from Chevron — an interesting and productive mix of industry professionals and academics. Here is a movie of our exploration in the quarry:

Our Burgess Shale group.  Clockwise starting with the guy in the orange shirt: Matthew James, Howard Adams, Rebecca Perlroth, Mark Wilson, Bob Rubin, Bob Davies, Kurt Burmeister.

Our Burgess Shale group. Clockwise starting with the guy in the orange shirt: Matthew James, Howard Adams, Rebecca Perlroth, Mark Wilson, Bob Rubin, Bob Davies, Kurt Burmeister.

Wooster geologist at the Burgess Shale

August 6th, 2009

FIELD, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA–I’ve been waiting to write those words! More later when I get better wireless access. The summary: my colleagues and I successfully made the long hike to the Walcott Quarry of the famous Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale today (5.5 hours to get there); it rained all morning, and then the sun appeared in time to dry out the outcrop before we arrived; we saw many wonderful fossils on this iconic outcrop.

walcottquarry01

Walcott Quarry of the Burgess Shale in the lower right, with Emerald Glacier and Mount Wapta in the background. Stunning in all respects!

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