Archive for July 19th, 2012

Analysis of a Rhuddanian (Llandovery, Lower Silurian) sclerobiont community in the Hilliste Formation on Hiiumaa Island, Estonia: a hard substrate-dwelling recovery fauna — An abstract submitted to the Geological Society of America for the 2012 annual meeting

July 19th, 2012

Editor’s note: The Wooster Geologists in Estonia this summer wrote abstracts for posters at the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting in Charlotte, North Carolina, this November. The following is from student guest blogger Jonah Novek in the format required for GSA abstracts:

Analysis of a Rhuddanian (Llandovery, Lower Silurian) sclerobiont community in the Hilliste Formation on Hiiumaa Island, Estonia: a hard substrate-dwelling recovery fauna

NOVEK, Jonah M., WILSON, Mark A., EKKA, Richa N., Department of Geology, The College of Wooster, Wooster, OH 44691 USA; AUSICH, William I., School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 USA; VINN, Olev, Department of Geology, University of Tartu, Ravila 14A, 50411 Tartu, Estonia

The Hilliste Formation on the island of Hiiumaa, western Estonia, is a Rhuddanian (Llandovery, Lower Silurian) sequence of limestones and shales.  It represents some of the earliest Silurian rocks on the paleocontinent of Baltica. The depositional system was tropical and shallow marine with tempestites indicated by overturned and broken corals and stromatoporoids. This unit contains a recovery fauna from the Ordovician Mass Extinction. Major taxa in the Hilliste Formation include crinoids, trilobites, bryozoans, corals, stromatoporoids, gastropods, and brachiopods. Sclerobiont communities (organisms that lived on or within hard substrates) have not yet been described from Rhuddanian faunas. The Hilliste Formation contains many encrusters and a few borings on skeletal substrates (primarily corals and crinoid stems). These sclerobionts include at least three kinds of crinoid holdfasts, cornulitids, sheet-like bryozoans, runner-type bryozoans, erect bryozoan holdfasts, and auloporid corals. Most if not all of these sclerobionts inhabited dead substrates. We studied the Hilliste Formation in a small quarry near the village of Hilliste on Hiiumaa. Numerous encrusted and bored specimens were collected for analysis of sclerobiont occurrences in this rare example of a Rhuddanian hard substrate community. These encrusters and borings, along with the macrofauna, have a distinct Late Ordovician aspect.

Stratigraphy and paleoenvironment of the Soeginina Beds (Paadla Formation, Lower Ludlow, Upper Silurian) on Saaremaa Island, Estonia — An abstract submitted to the Geological Society of America for the 2012 annual meeting

July 19th, 2012

Editor’s note: The Wooster Geologists in Estonia this summer wrote abstracts for posters at the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting in Charlotte, North Carolina, this November. The following is from student guest blogger Richa Ekka in the format required for GSA abstracts:

Stratigraphy and paleoenvironment of the Soeginina Beds (Paadla Formation, Lower Ludlow, Upper Silurian) on Saaremaa Island, Estonia

EKKA, Richa N., WILSON, Mark A., NOVEK, Jonah M., Department of Geology, The College of Wooster, Wooster, OH 44691 USA; VINN, Olev, Department of Geology, University of Tartu, Ravila 14A, 50411 Tartu, Estonia

The Soeginina Beds in the Paadla Formation on the island of Saaremaa, western Estonia, are a Lower Ludlow (Upper Silurian) sequence of dolostones, marls, and stromatolites. They represent rocks just above the Wenlock/Ludlow boundary, which is distinguished by a major disconformity that can be correlated to a regional regression on the paleocontinent of Baltica. We interpret the depositional environment of the Soeginina Beds as having been a hypersaline lagoon. Our evidence includes halite crystal molds, oscillation ripples, eurypterid fragments, stromatolites, ostracods, gastropods, Chondrites trace fossils, intraclasts and oncoids. Nautiloid conchs are common, probably because storm currents washed them in. We measured two sections of the Soeginina Beds at Kübassaare, eastern Saaremaa, western Estonia. The beds in one section are virtually horizontal; in the second they are steeply dipping, probably because of Pleistocene glacial ice overpressure. The beds begin with fine-grained dolostone and end with large, well-preserved domical stromatolites. The equivalent section at Soeginina Pank in western Saaremaa (about 86 kilometers away) has larger oncoids, branching coral fragments, and smaller stromatolites. It is also more heavily dolomitized. We interpret these differences as showing the western Soeginina Beds were deposited in slightly deeper, less saline waters than those in the east at Kübassaare.