Wooster Geologists Visit the Miller Oil and Gas Museum in Shreve, Ohio

February 21st, 2012

Geology 350 - The Oil and Gas of Geology spending a beautiful day in Shreve.

Drs. Judge and Wiles are teaching a half credit course in The Geology of Oil and Gas. After weeks of well log interpretation, rock core description and interpretive contour mapping exercises the class caught a break and traveled to the Miller Oil and Gas Museum on a beautiful February day in Shreve Ohio. We are grateful to the Raymond’s for showing us around the museum and explaining the use of the some of the equipment.

 

Picking out a plug for an abandoned well.

 

Fishing tools for when there is a problem or a lost drill string downhole.

A proponent of the health benefits of oil.

A class cube - the small class size at Wooster is measured in a cube cell.

One of the old rigs of the oilfields.

A question that commonly comes up is "what would an oilfield geologist do with a cannon?" (see below)

A creative solution to the problem of managing a flaming oil well.

Looking over a field rig.

Destined for law school this geologist models next to a drill string tamper.

 

 

George Davis (’64) gives the Thirty-First Annual Osgood Memorial Lecture

October 25th, 2011

WOOSTER, OHIO–We were greatly honored this evening to have one of our own, Dr. George Davis (Wooster ’64), present the 31st Annual Richard G. Osgood, Jr., Memorial Lecture. The Osgood Lectureship was endowed in 1981 by the three sons of Dr. Osgood in memory of their father, who was an internationally known paleontologist at Wooster from 1967 to 1981. We have had extraordinary experiences with visiting speakers through this lectureship, and tonight’s was one of the best.

Dr. Davis gave a public talk entitled “An evening’s geoarchaeological excursion to the Sanctuary of Zeus, Mt. Lykaion, The Peloponessos, Greece”. He described his stratigraphic and structural geological work in this fascinating region, which may have hosted the origins of the Zeus cult. It was (and still is) a thriving sports complex as well. Dr. Davis did interdisciplinary work as a geologist with his Brunton compass and as an archaeologist with a trowel — both iconic instruments of the professions.

Dr. Davis is a highly accomplished geologist with an outstanding reputation in teaching and research. After Wooster he earned a Master’s degree from the University of Texas at Austin, and then a PhD at Michigan. As a professor and chair at the University of Arizona for many years, he helped make that department into one of the best in the country. Dr. Davis has worked around the world and is best known for his analyses of geological structures in the Colorado Plateau and Basin & Range provinces. He is the author of a best-selling textbook in structural geology and has received many awards and honors. In July of next year he will become President of the Geological Society of America.
One of the joys of having our Osgood lecturer on campus is the traditional dinner with Wooster students and faculty before the talk. Dr. Davis had many geological stories to tell us, and he was a master at getting people around the table to talk about their motivations and geological dreams. A great evening was had by all!

Wooster Geology Heads to Wayne Elementary

October 21st, 2011

On Friday afternoon, a group of Wooster geologists participated in an educational outreach program at Wayne Elementary. Marge Forbush, an educator at Wayne always asks the department to come to her classroom twice a year. In the fall, we spend an afternoon talking to the students about volcanoes and earthquakes, while in the spring, we discuss fossils. This afternoon was particularly exciting. After a short introduction on volcanoes and earthquakes, the students then moved between 4 stations that we set up in the classroom. Geology majors at the college were each in charge of a station, fielding rapid-fire questions from the students. Lauren Vargo (’13) handled “Plate Tectonics”, while Nick Fedorchuk (’12) taught “Earthquakes”. Cameron Matesich (’14) showed the students “Intrusive Igneous Rocks”, and Sarah Appleton (’12) took charge of “Extrusive Igneous Rocks”. The Wayne Elementary students were excited to interact with department majors, and our majors did a fantastic job of teaching and mentoring.

The picture above shows everyone hard at work at their stations. Sarah (left in green), Nick (center in yellow), and Lauren (right in blue) had the attention of their students throughout the afternoon.

Cameron, above, is busy introducing the students to minerals and igneous rocks, which they were able to see close-up with the use of hand lenses.

They’re back! Nursery school students visit the tree-ring lab

October 19th, 2011

WOOSTER, OHIO — This time it was the turn of Dr. Greg Wiles to host the The College of Wooster Nursery School children as they visited Scovel Hall and its world-famous Wooster Tree-Ring Laboratory. He had ambitious plans for the little tikes, from studying the details of ring widths to donning safety gear to see how the wood is prepared.

Dr.Wiles shows close-up computer images of tree-rings to future dendrochronologists.

 

The main challenge here was simply keeping all those hard hats on.

We very much enjoy these visits in the Geology Department, and every one of them has its delightful challenges! Just last month we had the same children studying rocks and minerals with Dr. Shelley Judge and a stout team of Wooster students.

You’re never too young to be a geologist: Nursery School students visit Scovel Hall

September 30th, 2011

WOOSTER, OHIO–The Wooster Geologists have long had a special relationship with The College of Wooster Nursery School (where young children “actively construct their own knowledge of the world”). Every year our faculty and students talk to the children about rocks, fossils and dinosaurs. As you can imagine it is a most enjoyable — if a bit frantic — experience. For the past three years Professor Shelley Judge has been our primary faculty planner and organizer for these delightful events. Usually the kids walk up the hill from the nursery school about a block to Scovel Hall. There Shelley has exploration stations and, we hope, lots of college student volunteers to explain the materials.

Today the topic was simply “rocks”, and the children came to see and hold a variety of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic samples. Shelley set it all up and we had two sessions of about 18 kids each march in line up to the lab. They went through the specimens enthusiastically, feeling which are the smoothest and which the roughest, how heavy some are compared to others, seeing the world through a crystal of calcite, and marveling at ancient giant shark teeth. They each got to try on a hardhat, look through a handlens, and wear safety googles (which they find oddly fun). Then they line up and march back to the nursery school, clearly having enjoyed the experience. As did we!

Kit Price ('13) showing some of our sedimentary rocks and fossils to the children.

Katharine Schleich ('12) explaining some extrusive igneous rocks.

Shelley Judge talking to some of the children about minerals. Notice how intently they listen to her. She has the touch!

A Midday Biology & Geology Field Trip

September 28th, 2011

Geologist Greg Wiles and Biologist Rick Lehtinen in Spangler Park outside Wooster, Ohio.

WOOSTER, OHIO–Our colleague Rick Lehtinen in the Department of Biology had a great idea: how about a casual noon trip to the local Spangler Park to enjoy the plants, animals, rocks and streams? So Greg Wiles and I took him up on it and had a splendid couple of hours down in the gorge. We talked of ash trees, buried valleys, alluvial fans, salamanders and badgers. What an excellent break from grading!

Dr. Wiles showing where the creek flow goes from supercritical to subcritical.

An American Toad found by Dr. Lehtinen.

My contribution? An analysis of this beautiful set of bivalve, crinoid and brachiopod fossils from the Logan Formation (Mississippian).

 

Wooster Geologists begin the 2011-2012 school year

September 1st, 2011

WOOSTER, OHIO–The cheerful group above is the Wooster Geology Club in our traditional start of the year group photograph. (The image was kindly taken by Danielle Reeder.) We are fewer than usual because an unprecedented number of our geology majors are overseas on off-campus adventures (seven juniors) and our beloved petrologist Meagen Pollock is on a semester research leave. An addition to our crew this year is the man in the upper left with a beard. He is Matt Curren, our new geological technician.

Here you can see happy students in the 8:00 a.m. Invertebrate Paleontology course enjoying their first taste of taxonomic rules and the problem of species. Or maybe they’re grinning because they just learned there is not a quiz this morning?

There are two significant changes in Scovel Hall for this year. We have a new X-Ray Laboratory under the supervision of Dr. Pollock, complete with a “clean room” for wet chemistry. (I know what the alumni are thinking: A clean room in Scovel? But yes, it really is!) We also have fancy new (and wonderfully silent) computer projection systems in our classrooms, as seen below. We are now very far beyond those old 35 mm slide projectors I grew up with.

Our courses have detailed webpages that you are encouraged to visit. You may also want to see our list of Geology Club events, including Independent Study presentations and outside speakers. Finally, you can follow this link to pdf versions of our annual reports, including our report for this past year and summer (see cover below). Patrice Reeder works very hard to produce these high quality documents.

It is going to be another eventful year for the Wooster Geologists. We again thank the generations that have gone before us to build this department, and the alumni and friends who support us so faithfully.

Wooster Geology Majors Help with B-WISER

June 21st, 2011

The College’s of Wooster’s B-WISER (Buckeye Women In Science, Engineering, and Research) program for 7th and 8th grade girls descended upon Scovel Hall last week for some fun activities in geology. In an afternoon session with the campers, we divided them into several groups so that they could get more individualized attention as they moved from station to station. One station, which was taught by geology major Lindsey Bowman (’12), allowed the campers to look at a variety of minerals and igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. The focus of the station, though, was a fossil exercise in which campers tried to identify invertebrate fossils from large Ordovician rock slabs that the Mark Wilson has collected over the years. These slabs primarily contained brachiopods, bryozoans, rugose corals, bivalves, and trilobite fragments. In the image below, Lindsey (far left, blue shirt) is helping the campers identify Ordovician fossils.

The other station involved recreating a dinosaur trackway from Texas. The dinosaur tracks, as well as the stride distances between footprints, were to scale. B-WISER campers were tasked with figuring out which dinosaur was moving faster (bipedal or quadrupedal) and then coming up with a hypothesis of dinosaur behavior at the time the trackway was made. With help from William Cary (’13) and myself, campers navigated the measuring and math required to complete the task. Below is an image of the trackway in Scovel Hall; the campers are busy calculating the footprint length and stride length, while William (green shirt) is in the background helping with the activity.

At the end of the afternoon, all B-WISER campers came together for a final activity involving Plate Tectonics. Campers participated in a JIGSAW exercise created by Dale Sawyer (Rice University) in which they are divided into speciality teams: geography, seismology, volcanology, and geochronology. After analyzing data from only their specialty, mixed groups are formed so that there is at least one person from each speciality. Campers then put all of the data sets together to determine the position of the major plate boundaries on Earth. The B-WISER campers appeared to have a great time throughout the week, and geology sure enjoyed their visit!!

Wooster geologists in the heart of American science

June 9th, 2011

ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA–The National Science Foundation (NSF) is a federal agency charged by Congress “to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; to secure the national defenseā€¦” It had a budget last year of $6.9 billion and is a major source of funding for American scientific research, especially in colleges and universities. NSF is highly respected — and not a little feared — by working scientists. I visited NSF headquarters in Arlington, Virginia, for a meeting with Lisa Park Boush (Wooster ’88) who is a Program Director for Sedimentary Geology and Paleobiology. Although we were not discussing NSF business (we were transferring the Secretary position of The Paleontological Society from her to me), I learned a lot about the agency from Lisa. NSF officials work very hard, for one, and they are very concerned about the scientific communities they serve.

The impressive front of the NSF building in Arlington, Virginia.

Lisa Park Boush in her NSF office (with a coveted window view behind her). Lisa was one of my Independent Study students, so I am especially proud of her accomplishments and responsibilities.

Digital Geology

May 10th, 2011

With all of the excitement over digital presentations in Wooster’s Senior I.S. Symposium, we thought that it’s about time to highlight recent digital presentations with a geology twist. Enjoy!

Here’s a Vuvox collage of Becky’s Senior I.S. Project on the geochemistry of Icelandic subglacial pillow basalts:

Now try Lindsey’s Junior I.S. Prezi presentation, which explores the mineral compositions of Becky’s basalts.

If you like Prezi, you’ll want to see how Sarah used Prezi to present her Petrology project on trachyte.

While Prezi walks the viewer through the presentation, Glogster works more like a digital poster. Whitney used Glogster to illustrate her progress as she worked on her monzonite sample.

Of course, there’s always the classic documentary, like Andrew’s Dacite documentary. The documentary is closely related to the mockumentary – see Will’s petrology project on how to make a thin section as an example:

Even cartoons can convey geological information. Katharine’s Xtranormal characters discuss the identification of anorthosite.

And finally, if you’re looking for that certain geological bedtime story for your child, you’ll not want to miss Matt’s thrilling story about poikilitic textures and the case of the broken thin section.

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