Wooster Geologist in Ohio!

December 16th, 2009

CAESAR CREEK STATE PARK, OHIO–I’ve definitely extended my field season as far as possible.  (And what a season it has been.)  My last fieldwork at the end of this research leave was in Ohio, about three hours south of Wooster.  I visited Caesar Creek State Park this morning where a large cut through an Upper Ordovician section has been set aside as a fossil preserve of sorts.  It is an emergency spillway for Caesar Creek Lake, which is maintained by the US Army Corps of Engineers.  Many Wooster paleontology field trips have stopped here.  Fossils can be collected, but only with a permit (obtained at the visitor center) and following significant regulations.  The fossils are diverse and abundant, including all the stars of the Ordovician seafloor.

My task was to find, photograph and measure an old trace fossil friend: the boring Petroxestes pera.  This is a slot-shaped excavation in carbonate hard substrates formed by bivalves (probably in this case the modiomorphid Corallidomus).

The boring Petroxestes pera (the name means "purse-shaped rock-grinding") in a hardground at Caesar Creek State Park.

The boring Petroxestes pera (the name means "purse-shaped rock-grinding") in a hardground at Caesar Creek State Park.

These elongated holes are among the first bivalve borings.  Some of my students and I think they may have been formed in clusters, and they also may be oriented relative to each other and their local environment.  In any case, I found plenty.  It was an astonishingly cold morning, though, so I didn’t waste any time on the outcrop!

Yes, this photo is here mainly to show just how tough Wooster Geologists are.  And there are some very nice brachiopods and bryozoans!

Yes, this photo is here mainly to show just how tough Wooster Geologists are. And there are some very nice brachiopods and bryozoans!

You know that your field season is over …

December 16th, 2009

... when your car is well frosted.

... when your car is well frosted.

... and your outcrop looks like this!  (Whitewater Formation, emergency spillway at Caesar Creek State Park, Ohio; N39.47808°, W84.05981°)

... and your outcrop looks like this! (Whitewater Formation, Upper Ordovician, emergency spillway at Caesar Creek State Park, Ohio; N39.47808°, W84.05981°)

Tree Ring Dating of Revolutionary War (and some later) Buildings in PA and OH

June 7th, 2009

crew3This summer the Wooster Tree Ring Lab is funded by the College of Wooster’s Center for Entrepreneurship to date buildings of historical interest using tree rings. The crew in this endeavor is shown above and includes – Dr. Greg Wiles, students Kelly Aughenbaugh and Colin Mennett, and Nick Weisenberg who is a timber-framer and works in building restoration. The demand for our service has been excellent and is concentrated in the Pittsburgh area, locally in Kidron, Ohio and now in the Cincinnati area. We can use our archive of tree-ring data and lots of hard work by our staff to tell homeowners, folks at historical sites, historical archaeologists etc. the year timber was cut prior to building the structure. The tools of the trade are shown below. We will tell you a bit about the results of our work soon.

Below: The gear pile includes standard powertools and generators along with specialized dry wood bits. Nick illustrates the proper coring technique. This historic building is Woodville PA – the oak beams that he is coring were cut in the fall or winter of 1785.

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