Mineralogy of Hotspots

December 8th, 2009

The Mineralogy of Hotspots by Elizabeth Deering (’11).

Mineralogy of Acid Mine Drainage

December 4th, 2009

The Mineralogy of Acid Mine Drainage, presented by Lindsey Bowman (’12).

Mineralogy of Mars

November 19th, 2009

As promised, here’s another digital presentation. The Mineralogy of Mars is presented by Colin Mennett (’10).

Mineralogy of Hydrothermal Vents…in HD

November 6th, 2009

Our mineralogy students have been researching some fascinating topics and have recently created a suite of impressive digital presentations. Stay tuned over the next few weeks as we unveil their projects on the blog. The first presentation is by Megan Innis (’11) on the mineralogy of hydrothermal vents. Make sure your volume is turned up. Enjoy!

It was a dark and stormy night…Halloween in Mineralogy

October 30th, 2009

Tomorrow is Halloween, but Mineralogy students celebrated the holiday today by dressing as their favorite optical property. Guess what the people in the picture below are dressed as (hint: they are all under crossed polars!).

Becky Alcorn, Colin Mennett, Nick Fedorchuck, and Megan Innis are dressed as interference colors!

Becky Alcorn, Colin Mennett, Nick Fedorchuk, and Megan Innis are dressed as interference colors! Can you determine their birefringence?

The people below appear every 90 degrees when the stage is rotated under crossed polars…

Colin Mennett, Elizabeth Deering, Micah Risacher, and Becky Alcorn are at extinction!

Colin Mennett, Elizabeth Deering, Micah Risacher, and Becky Alcorn are at extinction!

Andrew Retzler (below) is dressed as muscovite under conoscopic illumination…

Retzler dressed as a Bxa interference figure.

Retzler dressed as a Bxa interference figure.

Okay, here’s a tough one. Lindsey Bowman’s costume represents the microscope set up when the analyzer is in the optical path…

Lindsey is a "crossed polar." Get it? Grumpy = crossed Polar!

Lindsey is a "crossed polar." Get it? Grumpy = crossed Polar!

Wooster Mineralogy students bring a whole new meaning to optics!

Mineralogy-Structure Field Trip to Pennsylvania

September 15th, 2009

Last weekend, Dr. Judge’s and Dr. Pollock’s Structure and Mineralogy classes took a field trip to central Pennsylvania. It rained on Saturday, but that didn’t stop us from having a great time. We saw the most amazing pencil structures in the Reedsville Shale.

The intersection of cleavage and bedding create "pencils."

The intersection of cleavage and bedding in the Reedsville Shale creates "pencils."

In the Bald Eagle Formation just a short drive down the road, we found textbook examples of slickenfibres. Slickenfibres are elongated minerals that grow along a fault plane parallel to the direction of motion.

Colin Mennett, Dr. Shelley Judge, Megan Innis, Becky Alcorn, and Andrew Retzler excited about slicken-fibers along a fault surface in the Bald Eagle Formation.

Colin Mennett, Dr. Shelley Judge, Megan Innis, Becky Alcorn, and Andrew Retzler are excited about slickenfibres along a fault surface in the Bald Eagle Formation.

Close-up view of the slicken-fibres.

Close-up view of the slicken-fibres.

Next, we went to the Bear Valley Strip Mine. The beautifully exposed folds and giant iron concretions are simply breathtaking!

Bear Valley Strip Mine. Notice the person in the yellow jacket (center of the picture) for scale.

Bear Valley Strip Mine. Notice the person in the black jacket (center of the picture) for scale.

Finally, we stopped to sample some (very orange) acid mine drainage at a nearby pump slope.

Palmer Shonk and Becky Alcorn standing beside a river full of "yellow boy," an iron hydroxide phase that is precipitating from acid mine drainage.

Palmer Shonk and Becky Alcorn standing beside a river full of "yellow boy," an iron hydroxide phase that is precipitating from acid mine drainage.

Become a fan of the College of Wooster Geology Department page on Facebook and see more photos from this trip!

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