Link to posts from Wooster Geologists in the United Kingdom in June 2015

June 29th, 2015

11 Mae Meredith Filey BriggI spent 25 days in England, Scotland and Wales this month, 12 of them with these two happy Senior Independent Study students, Mae Kemsley (’16) and Meredith Mann (’16) — dubbed “Team Yorkshire”. We had to delay our blog posts until today. You can see all of them by clicking the UK2015 tag. It was a spectacular expedition. Thanks again to Paul Taylor, Jen Loxton, Joanne Porter, Tim Palmer, Patrice Reeder and Suzanne Easterling for the parts they played in this adventure. Thank you as well to Mae and Meredith who were not only sharp field paleontologists, they were great companions as well. They are shown above on the tip of Filey Brigg in North Yorkshire. (N54.21560°, W00.25842°; Google Earth image below. Cool study site!)

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Last day of fieldwork in England: A working quarry and another great unconformity

June 26th, 2015

1 Doulting quarry sawBRISTOL, ENGLAND (June 26, 2015) — Tim Palmer has a professional interest in building stones, and a passion for sorting out their characteristics and historical uses. He thus has many contacts in the stone industry, from architects to quarry managers. This morning we visited the Doulting Stone Quarry on the outskirts of Doulting near Shepton Mallet in Somerset. Here a distinctive facies of the Jurassic Inferior Oolite is excavated for a variety of purposes. The rock has a lovely color, is relatively easy to work, and is durable. Above is a quarry saw that cuts out huge blocks from the natural exposure.

2 Thalassinoides layer DoultingSuch sawing produces great cross-sections for geologists to examine. We were particularly interested in that light-colored unit above with the irregular top and dark sediment-filled holes. The holes are part of a network of Thalassinoides burrows (tunnels made by Jurassic crustaceans) and reduce the value of the rock as a building stone. There is thus lots of it laying around the quarry yard for study.

3 Pinnid likely Trichites cross section DoultingOne impressive fossil exposed by the sawing is this pinnid bivalve, probably Trichites.

4 Burrow fill sediments DoultingThe Thalassinoides burrows are filled with a poorly-cemented sediment. It is full of little fossils, so we collected a bag of it for microscopic examination. It may give us clues as to what communities lived on the surface of this burrowed unit when it was part of the Jurassic seafloor.

5 shaping saw DoultingWe had a tour of the quarry shops, which included seeing these giant rock saws in action. Many of the saws are controlled by computers, so elaborate cuts can be made.

6 Medieval stone breaking marksThis rock has been quarried since Roman times, so there is over 2000 years of stone working here. The quarry owner set aside this rock face which shows chisel marks made in Medieval times. Wooden wedges were jammed into chiseled channels and then pulled over days to eventually crack the stone free.

7 Tedbury Camp wavecut surface along strikeAfter the quarry visit, Tim Palmer and I tromped through the woods and eventually found (with the help of several locals) an exposure known as Tedbury Camp. It is another Jurassic-on-Carboniferous unconformity like we saw at Ogmore-By-Sea earlier in the week. A century ago quarry workers cleared off this surface of Carboniferous limestone. It is a wave-cut platform on which Jurassic sediments (the Inferior Oolite) were deposited. The surface has many geological delights, including faults, drag folds, differentially-weathered cherts and carbonates, and Jurassic borings and encrusters. Beautiful.

8 wavecut surface foldingIn this view of the surface you may be able to see the odd folding of the dark chert layers in the right middle of the image. These seem to be drag folds along a fault. They clearly predate the Jurassic erosion of the limestone surface. The overlying Jurassic can be seen in the small outcrop on the left near Tim.

9 section view of wavecut surfaceIn this cross-section of the erosional surface you can clearly see we’re working with an angular unconformity.

10 filled borings wavecutTrypanites borings are abundant across this surface, most filled with lighter Jurassic sediment. There are other borings here too that deviate from the straight, cylindrical nature of Trypanites.

11 curved borings wavecutI don’t know yet how to classify these curved borings. They resemble Palaeosabella.

12 Encrusting bivalve wavecutHere is a Jurassic bivalve attached to the Carboniferous limestone at the unconformity. Most of the encrusters have been eroded away.

13 Tim on wavecut platformThere are many possibilities for further study of the Tedbury Camp unconformity. This was a productive site for our last field visit in England this year. Thank you very much to Tim Palmer, seated above, for his expertise, great companionship, and generosity with his time. It was a reminder of how much fun we had together in the field twenty years ago.

My month of geology in the United Kingdom has now come to an end. My next two days will be devoted to packing up and making the long train and then plane flights home. What a wonderful time I had, as did my students on the earlier part of the trip, Mae Kemsley and Meredith Mann. Thank you again to Paul Taylor for his work with us in Scarborough. I am very fortunate with my fine British friends.

For the record, the important locality coordinates from this trip —

GPS 089: Millepore Bed blocks N54.33877°, W00.42339°

GPS 090: Spindle Thorn Member, Hundale Point N54.16167°, W00.23326°

GPS 091: Robin Hood’s Bay N54.41782°, W00.52501°

GPS 092: Northern limit of Speeton Clay N54.16654°, W00.24567°

GPS 093: Northern limit of Red Chalk N54.15887°, W00.22261°

GPS 094: South section Filey Brigg N54.21674°, W00.26922°

GPS 095: North section Filey Brigg N54.21823°, W00.26904°

GPS 096: Filey Brigg N54.21560°, W00.25842°

GPS 097: D6 of Speeton Clay N54.16635°, W00.24520°

GPS 098: C Beds of Speeton Clay N54.16518°, W00.24226°

GPS 099: Lower B Beds of Speeton Clay N54.16167°, W0023326°

GPS 100: Possible A Beds of Speeton Clay N54.16129°, W00.23207°

GPS 101: A/B Beds of Speeton Clay N54.16035°, W00.22910°

GPS 102: C7E layer of Speeton Clay N54.16447°, W00.24043°

GPS 103: Lavernock Point N51.40589°, W03.16947°

GPS 104: Triassic deposits, Ogmore-By-Sea N51.46543°, W03.64094°

GPS 105: Sutton Stone Unconformity N51.45480°, W03.62609°

GPS 106: Sample of lowermost Sutton Stone N51.45455°, W03.62545°

GPS 107: Nash Point N51.40311°, W03.56212°

GPS 108; Devil’s Chimney N51.86402°, W02.07905°

GPS 109: Fiddler’s Elbow N51.82584°, W02.16541°

GPS 110: Doulting Stone Quarry N51.18993°, W02.50245°

GPS 111: Tedbury Camp unconformity N51.23912°, W02.36515°

 

Wooster Geologist in England (again)

June 25th, 2015

1 old quarry face cotswoldsBRISTOL, ENGLAND (June 25, 2015) — Our little geological exploration of southern Britain now passes into England. Tim Palmer and I crossed the River Severn and drove to the Cotswolds to examine old quarry exposures and Medieval stonework. We are parked above in Salterley Quarry near Leckhampton Hill.

2 devils chimney leckhamptonOur theme again is Jurassic. At Leckhampton Hill we examined exposures of the Middle Jurassic Inferior Oolite. It is not, of course, inferior to anything in the modern sense. The name, originally from William Smith himself, refers to its position below the Great Oolite. This is Devil’s Chimney, a remnant of stone left from quarrying in the 19th Century.

3 fiddlers elbow hdgd and Pea GritWe stopped along a bend in a Cotswold road called Fiddler’s Elbow and found an old carbonate hardground friend in the Inferior Oolite. Borings are evident in this flat, eroded surface. Next to the hammer are pieces of the Pea Grit, a coarser facies. I want to examine the grains for microborings and encrusters.

4 Dogrose leckhamptonThis is the gorgeous dog-rose (Rosa canina, not surprisingly), which is common in the Cotswolds. It is the model for the Tudor Rose in heraldry.

5 Fiddlers elbow orchidsThese tall orchids were also abundant near our outcrops.

6 fiddlers elbow orchids closeA closer view of the orchids. When I learn the name for this plant, I’ll amend this post. [And we have one! Caroline Palmer identified the flowers as Dactylorhiza sp. Thanks, Caroline!]

7 Painswick church and yewsAt the end of the day we stopped by St. Mary’s Church in Painswick, with its distinctive churchyard and variety of building stones. The sculptured trees are English yews.

8 Tim and Painswick gravestonesThe gravestones date back to the early 18th Century, with older ledger stones inside the church.

9 Painswick church pyramid markerThe unique pyramidal tomb of the stonemason John Bryan (1716-1787). He was apparently responsible for most of the 18th Century ornate monuments in this churchyard.

10 copper markers killing lichen PainswickMany of the gravestones have copper plates affixed to their upper faces. The rain washes copper ions out of the metal and over the limestone, killing the lichens and other encrusting organisms. This leaves the lighter patch of bare limestone. Somewhere in this is a study of microbiome ecological gradients!

11 St Marys church Painswick shot divot 1643The Painswick church was the site of a 1643 battle during the English Civil War. There are numerous bullet and shot marks on the exterior stones. Tim commented on the remarkable resilience of this stone to stay coherent after almost 400 years of weathering of these pits.

National Museum Wales and its new dinosaur

June 25th, 2015

1 National Museum WalesBRIDGEND, WALES (June 25, 2015) — On our last day in Wales, Tim had an errand at the National Museum Wales in Cardiff. We took the opportunity to visit their new dinosaur exhibit with the skeleton that had been collected from an outcrop we visited earlier in the week at Lavernock Point.

2 Dino displayThe exhibit is well done. The fossil skeleton represents the first carnivorous dinosaur found in Wales, and one of the earliest Jurassic dinosaurs found anywhere.

3 Lavernock dino bonesHere are some of the bones in lower Lias limestone.

4 Dino site museum imageThis is a museum photo of the dinosaur collecting site. You may recognize the place from a previous post in this blog.

Cardiff city hallThis is Cardiff City Hall. I loved the early 20th Century architecture in this Cardiff district, but we didn’t have time to explore. It is now off to southern England for more fieldwork.

Wooster Geologist in Wales

June 23rd, 2015

1 Triassic Lavernock Point Penarth GroupBRIDGEND, WALES (June 23, 2015) — My train journey yesterday was successful. It was close, but I made the four tight connections and arrived in Aberystwyth, Wales, from Thurso, Scotland, on schedule. It took 15 hours. My friend Tim Palmer was there to greet me as I stumbled out of my carriage. I went from rainy, cold Scotland to warm and sunny Wales. The top image is of the Triassic/Jurassic transition at Lavernock Point in south Wales (see below).

2 Tim Caroline houseMy first Welsh night was with Tim in his great country home (with is wife Caroline) on the outskirts of Aberystwyth. It is called The Old Laundry because of its function on a previous manorial estate. I had my best sleep here for the entire trip. Quiet and beautiful.

4 Talley Abbey ruinsOne of Tim’s passions is the study of building stones in England and Wales. As we drove to southern Wales for our geological work, we stopped by interesting stone structures, including the ruins of Talley Abbey, a 12th Century monastery.

5 Tim at Talley AbbeyTim is here examining the dressing stones on a corner of this pillar in the Talley Abbey ruins. I learned that these dressings are usually made of stone that can be easily shaped, is attractive, and will hold sharp edges. In many cases these are called “freestones”.

6 Lower Lias Lavernock dinosaur siteOur first geological stop was at Lavernock Point on the southern coast of Wales. We looked here at the boundary section between the Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic (Lias). In this view we see an alternating sequence of limestones (buff-colored) and shales (dark gray) of the lower Lias. These are marginal marine units with oysters and ammonites. On the left side of the image you can see a broad niche cut back into the cliff. This is the site where the first carnivorous dinosaur in Wales was recently excavated. It is also one of the oldest Jurassic dinosaurs since it was discovered just above the Triassic/Jurassic boundary. More on this dinosaur later.

7 Lower Lias pseudo mudcracksWe wandered across broad intertidal wave-cut platforms at Lavernock Point looking at the limestones and shales of the lower Lias. I was intrigued by these features on some bedding planes. They are not desiccation cracks, but rather some combination of jointing and weathering.

8 Liostrea hisingeri LavernockThe oyster Liostrea hisingeri is very common in this part of the Lias. In the limestones it is sectioned by erosion, resulting in these shelly outlines.

9 Liostrea hisingeri shale LavernockWhen Liostrea hisingeri is present in the shales, it is preserved three dimensionally.

10 Tonypandy street viewAfter our geologizing was done for the day, Tim and I drove up into the Rhondda Valleys just north of our hotel. This was at one time a very busy coal mining and industrial region, but the mines are closed and most of the heavy industry has moved elsewhere. Above is a view down a street in Tonypandy, one of the more famous towns of The Valleys. There were massive riots here in 1910 which eventually a minimum wage for miners in 1912.

Last day of fieldwork on Filey Brigg in Yorkshire

June 14th, 2015

1 Mae Meredith Passage Beds 061415SCARBOROUGH, ENGLAND (June 14, 2015) — It was a drizzly, breezy, cold day on the outcrops, but Team Yorkshire finished measuring and collecting for Meredith Mann’s project on the Passage Beds Member of the Coralline Oolite Formation (Upper Jurassic, Oxfordian) exposed on the north side of Filey Brigg, a spit of rock between Scarborough and Filey. In the posed but useful image above, Meredith stands at the base of the Passage Beds, and Mae holds a meter stick pointing to the top, with the cross-bar on the Thalassinoides unit at the base of the Hambleton Oolite.

2 Annotated Passage Beds 061415We designated five subsidiary units within the Passage Beds, as shown above. The rocks below belong to the Saintoft Member of the Lower Calcareous Grit Formation; the rocks above are the Hambleton Oolite (Lower Leaf) Member of the Coralline Oolite. Note how more ragged this exposure is because it directly faces the sea. The erosion better exposes the stratigraphy and fossils. It also means when we work here we are more subject to the elements.

3 Low tide access Filey BriggThis location on the north side of Filey Brigg is only accessible at low tide across slick algal-encrusted rocks. The angry sea looms to the right.

4 Bouldery walkWe have to climb over these boulders which are piled against a cliff face.

5 High tide escape ladderSince this area is flooded at high tide, if you wait too long to hike back the only escape from the raging North Sea is up this emergency ladder. I kept my eye on the ocean behind us!

6 Splashy Filey Brigg 061415The remorseless sea pounding away at Filey Brigg during a rising tide. I hate rising tides.

7 Mae Meredith working 061415Meredith and Mae at work collecting rock samples and fossils. We are somewhat protected here from the rain by the overhanging Hambleton Oolite. The wind still blew in plenty of water from sea and sky.

8 Thalassinoides in Unit 1An alcove in Unit 1 of the Passage Beds with galleries of the trace fossil Thalassinoides.

9 Crossbedding Unit 3Unit 3 of the Passage Beds shows cross-bedding, which is consistent with its origin as sediments washed shoreward during storms.

10 Unit 1 fossils 061415A cluster of oysters and pectinid bivalves in Unit 1 of the Passage Beds.

11 Mae Meredith Filey BriggWe celebrated completion of our fieldwork by walking as far out on Filey Brigg as we could! Miserable weather, but a dramatic setting! And no one broke a leg on the boulders or was trapped by the high tide.

Rain delay in Yorkshire. Time for sample management.

June 13th, 2015

Sample management 061315SCARBOROUGH, ENGLAND (June 13, 2015) — Our good fortune with the weather finally ended with a steady downpour this morning. Since it was during an advantageous tide, and I didn’t want us slipping around on wet intertidal boulders at Filey Brigg, we cancelled the day’s fieldwork. As generations of Wooster paleontologists know, this gives us time for Sample Management. We went through all that we collected, washed each fossil in my bathroom sink, and dried the lot on the hotel towels so kindly provided to us. It was the first time I got a good luck at many of the specimens the students collected, so it was rather fun. We then rebagged and labelled everything for the trip back home. Mae and Meredith have put together a nice collection for their studies. We have two more days of fieldwork to finish collecting for Meredith’s project.

Museum work and a castle visit in Scarborough

June 11th, 2015

1 Scarborough museum workSCARBOROUGH, ENGLAND (June 11, 2015) — It is always useful when doing paleontological fieldwork to visit the local museum to see what specimens they’ve curated over the years. Today Team Yorkshire explored the collections at the Scarborough Museums Trust Woodend storage facility, courtesy of Jennifer Dunne, Collections Manager. Above are Mae Kemsley (’16) and Meredith Mann (’16) examining boxes of specimens from the Speeton Clay and Coralline Oolite, the two units they’re working with.

2 Peltoceras williamsoniThis specimen of the ammonite Peltoceras williamsoni is an example of the kind of material we find in museum collections. It comes from the Passage Beds of the Coralline Oolite — Meredith’s unit. We are not likely to come across such a well-preserved fossil in our short interval of fieldwork. This is not the first Peltoceras in this blog.

3 Peltoceras noteThis note that accompanied the above specimen is from J.K. Wright, an expert with these fossils.

4 Scarborough castle keepAfter our museum work, we took an opportunity to visit Scarborough Castle. (We couldn’t do more fieldwork this afternoon because of the high tides.) This is a spectacular place with over 3000 years of history. It was the site of settlements in about 800 BCE and 500 BCE, and then a Roman signalling station around 370 CE. The castle itself dates back to the 12th Century. In 1645 it was the subject of a long Civil War siege, with Parliamentarians on the outside shelling Royalists on the inside. (The cannonades broke the above castle keep in half.) In December 1914, German battleships fired over 500 shells into it.

5 Team Yorkshire castle 061115Mae and Meredith with the castle keep in the background. Note the fantastic weather!

6 St Marys chapel castleThe remains of St. Mary’s Chapel within the castle walls were built on the site of the Roman signals station. Resident of the castle took shelter here during the 1914 German bombardment.

7 Scarborough from castleA view of Scarborough from the castle walls. We could see all of our field areas along the coast from this vantage point.

Another gorgeous day on the Yorkshire coast

June 10th, 2015

Dismantled pillbox Filey BeachSCARBOROUGH, ENGLAND (June 10, 2015) — We certainly can’t complain about the weather for our fieldwork in Yorkshire this year. Today was spectacular with blue skies and cool sea breezes. It made the long beach hikes very pleasant.

1 Mae on Speeton 061015This was our first day without our English colleague (and Yorkshire native) Paul Taylor, so we were on our own for transportation. We figured out the bus system, though, and made it to the Lower Cretaceous Speeton Clay at Reighton Sands in good time. Here is the last view you’ll have of Mae Kemsley (’16) working on her outcrops of this gray, mushy unit. We collected sediment samples this morning, along with a few last fossils.

2 Meredith on Speeton 061015Here is Meredith Mann (’16) doing the same. We finished all of our fieldwork for Mae’s project by 10:30 a.m., so we could make a long beach hike from the Speeton Cliffs northwards to Filey.

3 Meredith waiting on tide

4 Mae waiting on tideWe hiked as far as we could on Filey Brigg, but had to chill because our sites were still cut off by the high tide. Waiting for a tide to drop is tedious, but the students had plenty of patience.

5 Thalassinoides 061015We reached the large slabs of Hambleton Oolite Member (Upper Jurassic, Oxfordian) with Thalassinoides burrows to begin Meredith’s data collection. These are impressive trace fossils, with numerous shelly fossils in the surrounding matrix. We took reference photos and collected what we could. Unfortunately only three slabs met our criteria for measurements, so we moved to a unit exposed just below the Hambleton.

6 Cannonball concretionsOn the north side of Filey Brigg there are these large “cannonball” concretions, which were excellent stratigraphic markers for us. They are in the Saintoft Member of the Lower Calcareous Grit Formation. They told us that the units above were the Passage Beds Member of the Coralline Oolite Formation.

7 Passage Beds 061015Mae and Meredith are here collected fossils from the Passage Beds above the concretions. This unit is interesting to us because it contains shelly debris that was apparently washed onto shore during storms. These shells are often heavily encrusted with oysters and serpulids. Such sclerobionts have been little studied in this part of the section.

8 MMbus 061015On our sunny ride home the students sat in the front of the top section of our double-decker bus. Not a bad commute for a day’s work!

 

Team Yorkshire chooses projects

June 8th, 2015

5 Meredith on block 060815SCARBOROUGH, ENGLAND (June 8, 2015) — When we do field Independent Study projects in the Wooster Geology Department, we never know the exact topic until we’ve tested ideas on the actual outcrops. Today we did the last of our general exploration, and then at lunch Meredith Mann (’16) and Mae Kemsley (’16) decided on what they wanted to do for their projects. Meredith chose to study the fossil community associated with Thalassinoides trace fossils in the Birdsall Calcareous Grit Member of the Coralline Oolite Formation (Upper Jurassic, Oxfordian) at Filey Brigg. She’s shown above on one of the exposed bedding planes she will soon be examining in detail. Mae’s choice? You’ll read it here tomorrow.

1 Cayton Bay 060815We started our day in Cayton Bay, south of Scarborough. We had a long walk at high tide from our car south along the coast. After we hit the boulders in the middle of the view above, we saw no one else for the rest of the morning. The cliff is capped by Oxfordian limestones, with the thick Oxford Clay beneath. We had a few drops of rain while in Cayton Bay, but they didn’t develop into more than a sprinkle.

2 Kellaways rockWe couldn’t cross the boulder field (boulders and steep slopes are a theme of this expedition) until the tide receded a bit, so we spent some time examining this cliff exposure of the Osgodby Formation (Middle Jurassic, Callovian).

3 Gristhorpe BayWe crossed over Yons Nab (you just have to love these English place names) into Gristhorpe Bay to the south. Again, no other souls on this sunny day. After a quiet lunch, we retraced our route back to the car. The general reconnaissance is done. Time to start our work.

4 Filey Brigg 585 070815Back to Filey Brigg. This is a view down the axis of the Brigg as it enters the sea. Note what a spectacular day it is.

6 Meredith outcrop 060815Our job this afternoon was to work out the protocols of Meredith’s research, and pick her work sites. This is a beautiful exposure of the Birdsall Calcareous Grit Member on the north side of Filey Brigg. Note the Thalassinoides in place above Meredith. Meredith will be measuring and describing a section of the units here, and doing her mapping and collecting on the loose block along the Brigg itself.

Tomorrow we start Mae’s project!

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