Field trip to the lesser known makhteshim at Har ‘Arif

April 10th, 2014

Har 'Arif 041014MITZPE RAMON, ISRAEL–We’ve talked a lot about makhteshim in this blog, with so much of our geological work located in Hamakhtesh Hagadol and Makhtesh Ramon. A makhtesh is essentially a breached anticline, usually with a single drainage running from it. There are two small makhteshim at Har ‘Arif that are rarely seen because it takes some effort to get to them (major dirt road challenges and a significant hike) and they are in a military area that has very limited access. The Geological Survey of Israel got permission to run a field trip up to the top of Har ‘Arif today, and I was privileged to go along. The image above is of Har ‘Arif (the peak in the middle) looking up through the axis of the larger of the two makhteshim here. Its elevation is 956 meters, and it is the ninth highest peak in Israel. It is noted for its craggy, angular top, which is unlike most other Negev mountains with their rounded or flattened outlines.

Geologist camp 041014We began the day with an early departure from Mitzpe Ramon to meet most of the team camped out near Har ‘Arif. Note as the sun rises the crew has jackets on. It was an unseasonably cool start.

Hike begins 041014The hike begins. The goal is the very tippy-top of the mountain, so lots of work ahead in this beautiful setting.

Group outcrop 041014As with any geology field trip, we stopped occasionally for lectures on the outcrops. These lectures were in Hebrew so I was a spectator. It’s funny that after awhile I could pick out what the major arguments were from the tone of voice and various hand gestures. Several participants (especially Yoav) kindly interpreted for me afterwards. We are here examining an outcrop of the Middle Triassic Raaf Formation. This is a unit low in the Triassic that is not seen elsewhere in Israel.

Ripples Gyrochorte 041014These are ripplemarks in a fine sandstone of the Gevanim Formation (Middle Triassic, Anisian). Note the trace fossils that are convex epirelief, meaning they are positive relief on the surface of the bed. They are of the ichnogenus Gyrochorte, an old friend of mine from the Jurassic of Utah.

View west Har 'Arif 041014We reached the top of the mountain after an arduous climb. The coordinates are N 30.42591°, E 34.734°. (Really, google map these numbers. I worked hard for them!) This is the view to the east looking over the Negev all the way to the mountains of Jordan. One limb of the smaller makhtesh is below.

Har 'Arif Makhtesh 041014Here is the larger of the two makhteshim, looking west from the top of Har ‘Arif. It is gorgeous. All the rocks making the floor and walls are Triassic. The ridge line in the far distance is the border with Egypt.

I’ll have more later on the abundant flowers of the Har ‘Arif area. Right now it is a much-anticipated bedtime for me!

A mission in the Cretaceous of southern Israel

April 9th, 2014

Wadi Mishar viewMITZPE RAMON, ISRAEL–Today Yoav and I set out to solve a mapping dilemma concerning the boundaries of the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian) En Yorqe’am Formation in the Negev and, eventually, the Judean Desert to the north. It involved a bumpy ride deep into some of the most beautiful areas of the country, and it produced all sorts of delicious paleontological and sedimentological mysteries. I’ll talk more about this trip in later entires. Since it was 12 hours and I get up at 4:00 a.m. tomorrow, this is a truncated entry!

The setting is the stratigraphy of the En Yorqe’am and its bounding units: the Hevyon Formation below and the Zafit Formation above. Our job was to examine the contacts between these units and help come up with consistent definitions that can be used throughout the region. Right now there is considerable fuzziness as to where each formation begins and ends. Above is a labeled image showing the magnificent outcrop in Wadi Mishar (taken from our studied section at N 30.54899°, E 34.98843°).

Oysters En Yorqeam 040914In the process of sharpening the definition of the En Yorqe’am, we found some magnificent fossils. There are many paleontological and sedimentological projects possible in this unit. Oysters dominate the En Yorqe’am in mot places we visited. Above is a close view of one outcrop (at N 30.65788°, E 35.08764°; Nahal Neqarot) showing that the sediment is almost entirely oyster. The shells are often beautifully bored, but strangely there are virtually no encrusters.

Stromatoporoid En Yorqeam 040914To our surprise, we found these large roundish objects that look very much like stromatoporoids (at N 30.65788°, E 35.08764°). The lack visible mamelons (or corallites, for that matter), but internally they appear to show the typical laminations and pillars of these calcareous sponges. I’ve never seen them in the Cretaceous before, which is at the end of their range. I could be wrong and these fossils are odd altered corals. Only cutting and polishing will tell.

Terebratulids En Yorqeam 040914Also unexpected was the prevalence of brachiopods in parts of the En Yorqe’am (at N 30.65788°, E 35.08764°). These are articulated terebratulid brachiopods. They look very Jurassic in their appearance, but here they are in the Upper Cretaceous.

I’m looking forward to working with Wooster students on these outcrops next year! More on the En Yorqe’am later this week.

Cretaceous echinoderms are today’s stars

April 8th, 2014

Zichor 040814MITZPE RAMON, ISRAEL–There’s a joke in the title, in case you didn’t notice! I was on my own for my second day of fieldwork in southern Israel. I revisited yesterday’s outcrops of the Upper Cretaceous (Coniacian) Zichor Formation, taking more time to plot out future section-measuring and fossil-collecting sites for students. I was also able to spend a lot of classic nose-on-the-ground time sorting out the fossils.

The outcrop above is about the top half of the Zichor Formation in this area (N 30.30587°, E 34.96543°). Note the cemented limestones near the top and the soft marls in the foreground. Both have plenty of fossils, but you can imagine which is easier to collect from.

Filograna? 040814One mystery of this unit is at the very top of the section in one of the last bedding planes. There are extensive amounts of a twisty worm-tube called Filograna (or at least something close to it). You can see it in the above image. I was told earlier it was a “mat”, but it appears to be instead broken fragments of tube accumulations scattered about. Strange critter, this worm.Echinoid tests 040814The marls of the Zichor have an impressive echinoderm content. Since they have calcitic tests, they are very well preserved. Above are five heart urchins showing their classic pentameral symmetry.

Echinoid test plates 040814Here are fragments of a cidaroid echinoid test. In the middle of each plate is a circle with a boss extending outwards. Spines were attached to these, one of which is included in the image. I hope on our later expedition we can find whole specimens. Students are always up for these discovery challenges.

Asteroid ray oral 040814This was a first find for me: an asteroid (sea star) ray fragment. I don’t think I’ve ever found a sea star fossil before. We are looking above at the oral side where tube feet would have extended.

Asteroid ray aboral 040814This is the other side of the fragment — the aboral side. Beyond being cool, I’m afraid there is not a lot of significance for this fossil unless I can identify it further. Sea stars are famous for living in all sorts of marine environments, from the intertidal to deep trenches.

Some future Wooster students are going to have a good time with this unit sorting out the paleontological, sedimentological and stratigraphic contexts and then comparing this tropical fauna to the better known assemblages in the temperate north.

A Triassic afternoon in southern Israel

April 8th, 2014

Mitzpe Ramon distant view 040814MITZPE RAMON, ISRAEL–This afternoon I walked through the spectacular Middle Triassic sections in Wadi Gevanim on the southern side of the Makhtesh Ramon structure. I will be on a fantastic trip this Thursday to a little-visited Triassic section farther south, so I wanted to refresh my memory of these units. The above image is looking north from Wadi Gevanim to Mitzpe Ramon just visible on the cliff edge of the makhtesh. (What a setting, eh?)

Nautiloids Ammonites 040814I found myself almost completely repeating an entry from last year on Wadi Gevanim (which had the added bonus of students in it). Today I gathered some impressive fossil cephalopods from the Saharonim Formation (Middle Triassic, Anisian-Ladinian) for a group photograph. I note only now that one of the nautiloids above appears last year as well! From the upper left going clockwise: nautiloid, ammonite, nautiloid, ammonite. All are internal molds (the outer shell has been removed).

Nautiloid 040814That upper left nautiloid is worth a closer look. The mold has been split down the middle showing the septa (internal walls dividing the chambers) and an impressive “beaded” siphuncle (connecting tube) running the length of the conch (shell).

Terebratulids 040814Finally, here is a handful of the common terebratulid brachiopods from the Saharonim. Speaking of which, have I mentioned the species Menathyris wilsoni from the Saharonim? You certainly must meet Menathyris wilsoni!

A Wooster Geologist is finally warm enough

April 7th, 2014

Yoav Zichor 040714MITZPE RAMON, ISRAEL–When I left Wooster on Saturday morning it was 34°F and overcast. It was sunny and an astonishing 84°F when I arrived in Tel Aviv on Sunday afternoon. That additional 50 degrees felt very good indeed after a winter of polar vortices and late-March snowstorms. I’m now based in the Ramon Suites Hotel in Mitzpe Ramon near the lip of the spectacular Makhtesh Ramon (N 30.60638°, E 34.80128°).

I’m back in Israel as part of my research leave from the College. This is my chance to explore new outcrops and ideas with my Israeli colleagues to prepare for the next generation of Independent Study students — and, of course, to do plenty of science for its own sake. I miss my students, though, for their companionship, sharp eyes, challenging questions, and navigation abilities (i.e., telling me when I’ve taken a wrong turn). This is how the leave system works so that we always have fresh projects with interesting and testable hypotheses. This is my 11th field season in Israel.

Today I met my long-time friend Yoav Avni of the Geological Survey of Israel, along with Zeev Lewy, a paleontologist retired from the Survey, to look at a fossiliferous unit Zeev discovered over two decades ago south of Mitzpe Ramon. We looked at the thickest section of the Zichor Formation (Late Cretaceous, Coniacian) to sort out a remarkably diverse set of silicified (silica-replaced) fossils associated with a mat of worm tubes (possibly of the genus Filograna). The top image shows the upper portion of the Zichor, with Yoav for scale (location: N 30.30587°, E 34.96543°). The image below is a view of the bedding plane with most (but not all) of the silicified fossils colored dark brown.

Zichor silcified fossils 040714One of the cool things about this layer is that the fossils are silicified, which is rare in this part of the Cretaceous section. Another is that aragonitic mollusks are preserved in this way (especially gastropods and bivalves), along with their calcitic cousins (like oysters and pectenids). The Filograna-like worm tube layer itself is fascinating since no one knows much about the paleoecology of this group, and we suspect it may have some significant evidence about the paleoenvironment encoded in its spaghetti-like appearance.

Zichor Menuha contact 040714The top of the Zichor meets the bottom of the Menuha Formation chalks (Late Cretaceous, Santonian). In this view, the yellow and brown Zichor is in the foreground and middle ground, with the whitish Menuha in the background.

Zichor Menuha close 040714Yoav and I visited the boundary between the Zichor (darker unit on the left) and Menuha (lighter on the right) to assess their relationship (N 30.30212°, E 34.95909°). At outcrops 30 km to the north this boundary is marked by a deep unconformity (eroded interval) and a layer of encrusted and bored cobbles. Here the boundary is flat and nearly continuous. The layer of silicified shells is just a few centimeters below the unconformity. This may not be by chance — units immediately below unconformities often have silicified zones.

Some of you may remember these unit names from previous expeditions. Micah Risacher (’11) worked on the Zichor Formation and its fossils in the Makhtesh Ramon area, and Andrew Retzler (’11) did his Independent Study research on the Menuha. We can now build on their excellent work as we develop additional outcrops and new questions.

Ordnance 040714Finally, it wouldn’t be the Negev if there wasn’t some ordnance on the outcrop. Can you tell what kind of bomb is shown above? The clues are in its current condition!

Wooster Geologists at the North American Paleontological Convention in Florida

February 16th, 2014

Lizzie & Steph 021514GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA–Steph Bosch (’14), Lizzie Reinthal (’14) and I flew out of icy Ohio this weekend to attend the 10th North American Paleontological Convention in warm, sunny northern Florida. The students jointly presented the beautiful poster above on their Independent Study projects in the Matmor Formation (Middle Jurassic, Callovian) of southern Israel. It was very well received, especially with the addition of fantastic scanning electron microscope images of bryozoans produced by our colleague Paul Taylor at the Natural History Museum in London.

Crowd scene 021514Here’s a crowd scene from the first poster session at NAPC. If you look closely in the center, you’ll see two Wooster alumnae who are prominent paleontologists. Can’t swing a cat at a paleo meeting without hitting Wooster Geologists.

Hilton 021514This is a nondescript image of our hotel and convention center in Gainesville. I show it only to marvel in the blue, blue sky and perfect temperatures. We are on the University of Florida campus near the Florida Museum of Natural History. The paleontology staff at that museum is sponsoring this meeting — and they are doing an extraordinary job made more complex by the absence of about a third of the participants still snow-bound in the north. We escaped through a window of clear weather in Ohio.

Last official meeting of Wooster Team Israel

January 10th, 2014

Team Israel 2013 011014WOOSTER, OHIO — Above you see Wooster Team Israel 2013 veterans Lizzie Reinthal, Steph Bosch and Oscar Mmari (whom I seem to have caught with his mouth full). Since I’m starting a research leave this semester, we took a last chance to have an evening meeting with pizza, lemon dessert, popcorn and a movie in the warm Wilson living room. It is wintry Ohio outside, but we all have memories of the beautiful Negev:

GoodbyeMakhteshGadol070713a

And what was the movie? You really don’t need to ask, do you?

Lawrence poster

Wooster’s Fossil of the Week: A long scleractinian coral from the Middle Jurassic of Israel

November 17th, 2013

Enallhelia_370_Callovian_Israel_585Just one image for this week’s fossil, but we make up for the numbers in image length! The above fossil with the alternating “saw teeth” is the scleractinian coral Enallhelia d’Orbigny, 1849. It is a rare component of the diverse coral fauna found in the Matmor Formation (Callovian-Oxfordian) in southern Israel. I collected this particular specimen (from locality C/W-370 in Hamakhtesh Hagadol, for the record) during this past summer’s expedition to the Negev. It is preserved remarkably well considering that its original aragonite skeleton has been completely calcitized.

Enallhelia is in the Family Stylinidae, also named by French naturalist Alcide Charles Victor Marie Dessalines d’Orbigny. (Love that name; he was briefly profiled in a previous entry.) There are many species in the genus (at least two dozen), but I can’t figure out which this one is. I’ll need a coral expert because half of the available species look pretty much the same to me. Enallhelia is a dendroid coral, meaning its corallum has tree-like branches, only one of which we see here. Each branch has alternating corallites on each side, which in life would have held the individual tentacular polyps. Each corallite has radial symmetry, not the usual hexameral symmetry as seen in most scleractinians. The genus ranges from the Jurassic into the Cretaceous and is cosmopolitan. Enallhelia is especially well known from Europe, but that may be just a collector effect.

What I like about Enallhelia is that it can be an excellent paleoenvironmental marker. Leinfelder and Nose (1997) show that it is most often found in “marly coral meadows” near storm wavebase on carbonate platforms. This means it is in shallow but quiet waters well within the photic zone most of the time, but may be occasionally disturbed by storm wave currents. This is an accurate description of most of the depositional environment of the Matmor Formation.

References:

Hudson, R.G.S. 1958. The upper Jurassic faunas of southern Israel. Geological Magazine 95: 415-425.

Leinfelder, R.R. and Nose, M. 1997. Upper Jurassic coral communities within siliciclastic settings (Lusitanian Basin, Portugal): Implications for symbiotic and nutrient strategies. Proceedings of the 8th International Coral Reef Symposium 2: 1755-1760.

Olivier, N., Martin-Garin, B., Colombié, C., Cornée, J.-J., Giraud, F., Schnyder, J., Kabbachi, B. and Ezaidi, K. 2012. Ecological succession evidence in an Upper Jurassic coral reef system (Izwarn section, High Atlas, Morocco). Geobios 45: 555-572.

Wooster paleontologists present at the Geological Society of America meeting in Denver

October 28th, 2013

Lizzie102813DENVER, COLORADO–Yesterday Oscar Mmari (’14) gave the first presentation from Wooster’s Team Israel 2013 at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in Denver. Today our two paleontologists on the team discussed their posters.

Above is Lizzie Reinthal (’14) cheerfully giving her poster entitled: “Taphonomic feedback and facilitated succession in a Middle Jurassic shallow marine crinoid community (Matmor Formation, southern Israel)“. Her work is co-authored with our friend Howie Feldman. Below Steph Bosch (’14) is ready to discuss her work: “First bryozoan fauna described from the Jurassic tropics: Specimens from the Matmor Formation (Middle Jurassic, Upper Callovian) in southern Israel“. Steph’s poster has the famous palaeontologist Paul Taylor as a co-author.

Steph102813It is great fun to see these students make the transition, both intellectually and physically, from the scorched desert floor of the Negev to such a professional setting. The faculty are very proud.

 

First Wooster geology presentation at the 2013 annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in Denver, Colorado

October 27th, 2013

Oscar102713DENVER, COLORADO–It’s that time of year for geologists when we collect at one of two major national meetings. Wooster geologists are always well represented at the Geological Society of America convention, this year held in downtown Denver. Meagen Pollock, Shelley Judge and I are here with nine enthusiastic Wooster students. Some events have already taken place (notably for me the paleontology short course and an epic annual banquet meeting of the Paleontological Society), and we’ve had our first student poster presentation.

Oscar Mmari is shown above with his poster entitled: “Syndepositional faulting, shallowing and intraformational conglomerates in the Mishash Formation (Upper Cretaceous, Campanian) at Wadi Hawarim, southern Israel“. Readers of this blog will remember Oscar’s summer work in the Negev measuring and describing sections. Oscar’s presentation went very well. Every time I stopped by the poster someone was in deep conversation with him.

CCC102813Here’s an early morning view of the Colorado Convention Center in Denver where we’re doing our work and study (and socializing, truth be told). The weather this weekend has been fantastic, but a big change will come tomorrow morning.

More posts will follow!

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