Wooster’s Fossil of the Week: A calcareous sponge from the Lower Cretaceous of England

July 24th, 2015

Raphidonema faringdonense 070715a 585One of my favorite fossil localities is a gravel pit in Oxfordshire, England. Gravel pits are not usually good for fossil collecting given their coarse nature and high-energy deposition, but the Lower Cretaceous (Aptian) Faringdon Sponge Gravels are special. They are tidal gravels sitting unconformably over Jurassic rocks that have an extraordinary diversity and abundance of marine fossils, both from the Cretaceous and reworked from the Jurassic below. I have previously described in this blog bored cobbles, bryozoans, ammonites and a plesiosaur vertebra from this unit. Above is one of the most characteristic fossils from Faringdon, the calcareous sponge Raphidonema faringdonense (Sharpe, 1854).
Raphidonema faringdonense 070715b 585This is a view of the upper surface of this sponge. Like most sponges it was a filter-feeder sitting stationary on the seafloor. This one was probably attached to a cobble in the gravel. It is in the Class Calcarea because it has a fused network of calcitic spicules making up its skeleton. This is why it has remained a very resistant, rigid object long after death. It probably spent some time rolling around in those gravels with the tidal currents.
Sophie Faringdon 2007The Faringdon Sponge Gravels are a member of the Faringdon Sand Formation. They are cross-bedded gravels that have been mined for construction purposes since Roman times. Above is Wooster Geologist Sophie Lehmann (as a student) when she and I visited one of the gravel pits in 2007. For the record, this sponge comes from the Red Gravel, 5.5-8.5 meters above the disconformity with Oxfordian limestones, in the Wicklesham gravel pit on the southeast edge of Faringdon, Oxfordshire (51.647112° N, 1.585094° W).

after Maull & Polyblank, photogravure, circa 1856

Daniel Sharpe FRS (1806-1856) named Raphidonema faringdonense in 1854. He was born in Marylebone, Middlesex, England. His mother died shortly after his birth and he was raised by his uncle Samuel Rogers, a literary figure of some merit. He entered the mercantile business as an apprentice when he was 16, and he stayed connected with trading the rest of his life. His first research as a geologist (and this was very early in the discipline of geology) was examining geological structures around Lisbon, Portugal. He then studied the strata of north Wales and the Lake District of England. Sharpe was an early opponent of Adam Sedgwick in a dispute over the Cambrian, which brought him some notoriety among English geologists. His most prominent geological work was sorting out what rock cleavage meant in regard to stress and strain, using distorted fossils as part of his evidence. He died as the result of a riding accident in 1856, shortly after he had been elected president of the Geological Society of London.

Sorting out the taxonomic history of Raphidonema faringdonense is more complex than I would have expected for such a simple fossil. I’m using the most common version of the name, but we also see “farringdonense“, “faringdonensis” and farringdonensis“. (I know. Who worries about such things?)
Manon farringdonense Sharpe figuresManon farringdonense description 1854Above are Sharpe’s original figures of Raphidonema faringdonense, along with his description (and the nice bryozoan Reptoclausa hagenowi below). We can see that he spelled the species name with a double r in keeping with a common spelling of the village’s name then. I don’t know when we lost one of those letters.

Just to add to the complexity, Raphidonema is also the genus name of a filamentous green alga. Since it is not an animal, though, there is no legal problem with having the name also refer to a sponge. (There should be a rule against such homonymy, but there’s not.)

References:

Austen, R.A.C. 1850. On the age and position of the fossiliferous sands and gravels of Faringdon. Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London 6: 454-478.

Lhwyd, E. 1699. Lithophylacii Britannici Ichnographia. 139 pp. London.

Pitt, L.J. and Taylor, P.D. 1990. Cretaceous Bryozoa from the Faringdon Sponge Gravel (Aptian) of Oxfordshire. Bulletin of the British Museum, Natural History. Geology 46: 61-152.

Sharpe, D. 1854. On the age of the fossiliferous sands and gravels of Farringdon and its neighbourhood. Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London 10: 176-198.

Wilson, M. A. (1986). Coelobites and spatial refuges in a Lower Cretaceous cobble-dwelling hardground fauna. Palaeontology, 29(4), 691-703.

Wooster’s Fossil of the Week: A coiled nautiloid from the Middle Devonian of Ohio

July 17th, 2015

Goldringia cyclops Columbus Ls Devonian 585The above fossil is a nautiloid cut in cross-section, showing the large body chamber at the bottom and behind it to the left and above the phragmocone, or chambered portion of the conch (shell). It is a species of Goldringia Flower, 1945, found in the Columbus Limestone (Middle Devonian, Eifelian) exposed in the Owen Stone Quarry near Delaware, Ohio. It is a nice specimen for both what it shows us about a kind of nautiloid coiling and for clues to its preservation.

This specimen was originally labelled Gyroceras cyclops Hall, 1861. In 1945, Rousseau Flower designated this taxon the type species of Goldringia. I can’t tell if we really have G. cyclops here or some other species, so I’m leaving it at the genus level. The old name lingers, though, in the term for this kind of open coiling: gyroceraconic. It is one of the earliest examples of the nautiloids having the phragmocone positioned above the body chamber, presumably for stable buoyancy.
Pentamerid embedded 071315I like the clues to the early history of this conch after death. The chambers are entirely filled with sediment, a fossiliferous micrite. You can see places where the original shell was broken and larger bits infiltrated, like the whole brachiopod shown above. This brachiopod appears from its cross-section to be a pentamerid. Also visible are strophomenid brachiopods and gastropods.
Winifred GoldringRousseau Hayner Flower (1913–1988) described Goldringia in 1945. He doesn’t directly say who he named it after, but he thanks “Dr. Winifred Goldring of the New York State Museum” in the acknowledgments. We can tell Flower’s story later (and it’s a good one), but this gives us a chance to introduce Winifred Goldring (1888-1971). She was the first paleontologist to describe the famous Gilboa fossil flora (Devonian) in upstate New York, and she was the first woman State Paleontologist of New York (or anywhere, for that matter). (Now there is Lisa Amati in this prestigious position. Congratulations, Lisa!) Goldring grew up near Albany, New York, one of nine children in a very botanical family. She graduated from Wellesley College in 1909 with a bachelor’s degree in geology (very unusual for a woman at the time). She stayed at Wellesley to earn a master’s degree (1912). She also taught geology courses at Wellesley. In 1913 she studied geology at Columbia University with the famous Amadeus Grabau. In 1914, Goldring joined the scientific staff at the New York State Museum as a “scientific expert”. She worked her way up through the many ranks there to become State Paleontologist in 1939. She is best known as a paleontologist for her work with the fascinating Gilboa fossil forest, bringing her early upbringing by botanists to full circle. Along the way she was the first woman president of the Paleontological Society (in 1949) and vice-president of the Geological Society of America (in 1950). A hero of paleontology.

References:

Flower, R.H. 1945. Classification of Devonian nautiloids. American Midland Naturalist 33: 675–724.

Goldring, W. 1927. The oldest known petrified forest. Scientific Monthly 24: 514–529.

Koninck, L.G.D. 1880. Faune du Calcaire Carbonifere de la Belgique, deuxieme partie, Genres Gyroceras, Cyrtoceras, Gomphoceras, Orthoceras, Subclymenia et Goniatites. Annales du Musee Royal d‘Histoire Naturelle, Belgique 5: 1–333.

Wooster’s Fossil of the Week: A small lobster from the Lower Cretaceous of North Yorkshire, England

July 10th, 2015

Meyeria ornata fullMae Kemsley (’16) found this little beauty during her Independent Study fieldwork last month on the Speeton Cliffs of North Yorkshire. It is Meyeria ornata (Phillips, 1829), a decapod of the lobster variety, from the Speeton Clay. It is relatively common in Bed C4, so much so that it is referred to as “the shrimp bed”. Mae is the only one of our team of four who found one, though, so it is special to us. The above is a lateral view, with the head to the left and abdomen on the top of this small concretion.
Dorsal Meyeria ornataHere is a dorsal view looking down on the abdominal segments.
Screen Shot 2015-07-01 at 9.14.03 PMSimpson and Middleton (1985, fig. 1b) have this excellent diagram of Meyeria ornata in life position. The scale bar is one centimeter. “Details of pleopods, third maxillipeds and first antennae of M. ornata unknown. Dashed line represents length of extended abdomen. Symbols: a branchiocardiac groove; c postcervical groove; e cervical groove; m3 third maxilliped; p pereiopod; pi pleopod; t telson; u uropods; x ‘x’ area; r rostrum; al first antennae; a2 second antennae; ar antennal ridge; sr suborbital ridge; 1,2,3. branchial ridges.”

According to Simpson and Middleton (1985), Meyeria ornata actively crawled about on the muddy substrate like modern lobsters. They did not have true chelae (large claws), so they were likely scavengers in the top layers of the sediment rather than predators.

3 Mae working 060915Mae at work.

References:

Charbonnier, S., Audo, D., Barriel, V., Garassino, A., Schweigert, G. and Simpson, M. 2015. Phylogeny of fossil and extant glypheid and litogastrid lobsters (Crustacea, Decapoda) as revealed by morphological characters. Cladistics 31: 231-249.

M’Coy F. 1849. On the classification of some British fossil Crustacea with notices of new forms in the University Collection at Cambridge. Annals and Magazine of Natural History, series 2, 4, 161-179.

Phillips, J. 1829. Illustrations of the geology of Yorkshire, Part 1. The Yorkshire coast: John Murray, London, 184 p.

Simpson, M.I. and Middleton, R. 1985. Gross morphology and the mode of life of two species of lobster from the Lower Cretaceous of England: Meyeria ornata (Phillips) and Meyerella magna (M’Coy). Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh: Earth Sciences 76: 203-215.

Wooster’s Fossils of the Week: An Upper Ordovician cave-dwelling bryozoan fauna and its exposed equivalents

July 3rd, 2015

1 Downwards 063015This week’s fossils were the subject of a presentation at the 2015 Larwood Symposium of the International Bryozoology Association in Thurso, Scotland, last month. Caroline Buttler, Head of Palaeontology at the National Museum Wales, Cardiff, brilliantly gave our talk describing cryptic-and-exposed trepostome bryozoans and their friends in an Upper Ordovician assemblage I found years ago in northern Kentucky. They were the subject of an earlier Fossil of the Week post, but Caroline did so much fine work with new thin sections and ideas that they deserve another shot at glory. We are now working on a paper about these bryozoans and their borings. Below you will find the abstract of the talk and a few key slides to tell the story.

__________________________________

Trepostome bryozoans have been found as part of an ancient cave fauna in rocks of the Upper Ordovician (Caradoc) Corryville Formation exposed near Washington, Mason County, Kentucky.

Bryozoans are recognized as growing from the ceiling of the cave and also from an exposed hardground surface above the cave. Multiple colonies are found overgrowing one another and the majority are identified as Stigmatella personata. Differences between those growing upwards and those growing down from the roof have been detected in the limited samples.

The colonies have been extensively bored, these borings are straight and cylindrical. They are identified as Trypanites and two types are recognised. A smaller variety is confined within one colony overgrowth and infilled with micrite. In thin section it is observed that the borings follow the lines of autozooecial walls and do not cut across. This creates a polygonal sided boring, suggesting that the colonies were not filled with calcite at the time of the boring. The second variety has a larger tube size and its infilling sediment has numerous dolomite rhombs and some larger fossil fragments including cryptostomes, shell and echinoderm pieces. These cut through several layers of overgrowing bryozoans. Some of the borings contain cylindrical tubes of calcite similar to the ‘ghosts’ of organic material described by Wyse Jackson & Key (2007).

Very localised changes in direction of colony growth due to an environmental effect are seen.

Bioclaustration in these samples provides evidence for fouling of the colony surface, indicating that the bryozoans overgrew unknown soft-bodied organisms.

Reference:

Wyse Jackson, P. N., and M. M. Key, Jr. (2007). Borings in trepostome bryozoans from the Ordovician of Estonia: two ichnogenera produced by a single maker, a case of host morphology control. Lethaia. 40: 237-252.

2 Title 0630153 Location 0630154 Strat position 0630155 hdgd up 0630156 hdgd down 0630157 Growth up 0630158 Growth down 0630159 Stigmatella 06301510 Cartoon 06301511 Boring A 06301512 Boring B 06301513 Ghosts explanation14 Ghosts 06301515 Overgrowths 06301516 Further questions 063015

Link to posts from Wooster Geologists in the United Kingdom in June 2015

June 29th, 2015

11 Mae Meredith Filey BriggI spent 25 days in England, Scotland and Wales this month, 12 of them with these two happy Senior Independent Study students, Mae Kemsley (’16) and Meredith Mann (’16) — dubbed “Team Yorkshire”. We had to delay our blog posts until today. You can see all of them by clicking the UK2015 tag. It was a spectacular expedition. Thanks again to Paul Taylor, Jen Loxton, Joanne Porter, Tim Palmer, Patrice Reeder and Suzanne Easterling for the parts they played in this adventure. Thank you as well to Mae and Meredith who were not only sharp field paleontologists, they were great companions as well. They are shown above on the tip of Filey Brigg in North Yorkshire. (N54.21560°, W00.25842°; Google Earth image below. Cool study site!)

Screen Shot 2015-06-29 at 11.47.54 AM

Last day of fieldwork in England: A working quarry and another great unconformity

June 26th, 2015

1 Doulting quarry sawBRISTOL, ENGLAND (June 26, 2015) — Tim Palmer has a professional interest in building stones, and a passion for sorting out their characteristics and historical uses. He thus has many contacts in the stone industry, from architects to quarry managers. This morning we visited the Doulting Stone Quarry on the outskirts of Doulting near Shepton Mallet in Somerset. Here a distinctive facies of the Jurassic Inferior Oolite is excavated for a variety of purposes. The rock has a lovely color, is relatively easy to work, and is durable. Above is a quarry saw that cuts out huge blocks from the natural exposure.

2 Thalassinoides layer DoultingSuch sawing produces great cross-sections for geologists to examine. We were particularly interested in that light-colored unit above with the irregular top and dark sediment-filled holes. The holes are part of a network of Thalassinoides burrows (tunnels made by Jurassic crustaceans) and reduce the value of the rock as a building stone. There is thus lots of it laying around the quarry yard for study.

3 Pinnid likely Trichites cross section DoultingOne impressive fossil exposed by the sawing is this pinnid bivalve, probably Trichites.

4 Burrow fill sediments DoultingThe Thalassinoides burrows are filled with a poorly-cemented sediment. It is full of little fossils, so we collected a bag of it for microscopic examination. It may give us clues as to what communities lived on the surface of this burrowed unit when it was part of the Jurassic seafloor.

5 shaping saw DoultingWe had a tour of the quarry shops, which included seeing these giant rock saws in action. Many of the saws are controlled by computers, so elaborate cuts can be made.

6 Medieval stone breaking marksThis rock has been quarried since Roman times, so there is over 2000 years of stone working here. The quarry owner set aside this rock face which shows chisel marks made in Medieval times. Wooden wedges were jammed into chiseled channels and then pulled over days to eventually crack the stone free.

7 Tedbury Camp wavecut surface along strikeAfter the quarry visit, Tim Palmer and I tromped through the woods and eventually found (with the help of several locals) an exposure known as Tedbury Camp. It is another Jurassic-on-Carboniferous unconformity like we saw at Ogmore-By-Sea earlier in the week. A century ago quarry workers cleared off this surface of Carboniferous limestone. It is a wave-cut platform on which Jurassic sediments (the Inferior Oolite) were deposited. The surface has many geological delights, including faults, drag folds, differentially-weathered cherts and carbonates, and Jurassic borings and encrusters. Beautiful.

8 wavecut surface foldingIn this view of the surface you may be able to see the odd folding of the dark chert layers in the right middle of the image. These seem to be drag folds along a fault. They clearly predate the Jurassic erosion of the limestone surface. The overlying Jurassic can be seen in the small outcrop on the left near Tim.

9 section view of wavecut surfaceIn this cross-section of the erosional surface you can clearly see we’re working with an angular unconformity.

10 filled borings wavecutTrypanites borings are abundant across this surface, most filled with lighter Jurassic sediment. There are other borings here too that deviate from the straight, cylindrical nature of Trypanites.

11 curved borings wavecutI don’t know yet how to classify these curved borings. They resemble Palaeosabella.

12 Encrusting bivalve wavecutHere is a Jurassic bivalve attached to the Carboniferous limestone at the unconformity. Most of the encrusters have been eroded away.

13 Tim on wavecut platformThere are many possibilities for further study of the Tedbury Camp unconformity. This was a productive site for our last field visit in England this year. Thank you very much to Tim Palmer, seated above, for his expertise, great companionship, and generosity with his time. It was a reminder of how much fun we had together in the field twenty years ago.

My month of geology in the United Kingdom has now come to an end. My next two days will be devoted to packing up and making the long train and then plane flights home. What a wonderful time I had, as did my students on the earlier part of the trip, Mae Kemsley and Meredith Mann. Thank you again to Paul Taylor for his work with us in Scarborough. I am very fortunate with my fine British friends.

For the record, the important locality coordinates from this trip —

GPS 089: Millepore Bed blocks N54.33877°, W00.42339°

GPS 090: Spindle Thorn Member, Hundale Point N54.16167°, W00.23326°

GPS 091: Robin Hood’s Bay N54.41782°, W00.52501°

GPS 092: Northern limit of Speeton Clay N54.16654°, W00.24567°

GPS 093: Northern limit of Red Chalk N54.15887°, W00.22261°

GPS 094: South section Filey Brigg N54.21674°, W00.26922°

GPS 095: North section Filey Brigg N54.21823°, W00.26904°

GPS 096: Filey Brigg N54.21560°, W00.25842°

GPS 097: D6 of Speeton Clay N54.16635°, W00.24520°

GPS 098: C Beds of Speeton Clay N54.16518°, W00.24226°

GPS 099: Lower B Beds of Speeton Clay N54.16167°, W0023326°

GPS 100: Possible A Beds of Speeton Clay N54.16129°, W00.23207°

GPS 101: A/B Beds of Speeton Clay N54.16035°, W00.22910°

GPS 102: C7E layer of Speeton Clay N54.16447°, W00.24043°

GPS 103: Lavernock Point N51.40589°, W03.16947°

GPS 104: Triassic deposits, Ogmore-By-Sea N51.46543°, W03.64094°

GPS 105: Sutton Stone Unconformity N51.45480°, W03.62609°

GPS 106: Sample of lowermost Sutton Stone N51.45455°, W03.62545°

GPS 107: Nash Point N51.40311°, W03.56212°

GPS 108; Devil’s Chimney N51.86402°, W02.07905°

GPS 109: Fiddler’s Elbow N51.82584°, W02.16541°

GPS 110: Doulting Stone Quarry N51.18993°, W02.50245°

GPS 111: Tedbury Camp unconformity N51.23912°, W02.36515°

 

Wooster’s Fossils of the Week: An encrusted bivalve external mold from the Upper Ordovician of Indiana

June 26th, 2015

1 Anomalodonta gigantea Waynesville Franklin Co IN 585I love this kind of fossil, which explains why you’ve seen so many examples on this blog. We are looking at an encrusted external mold of the bivalve Anomalodonta gigantea found in the Waynesville Formation exposed in Franklin County, Indiana. I collected it many years ago as part of an ongoing study of this kind of preservation and encrustation.
2 Anomalodonta gigantea Waynesville Franklin Co IN 585 annotatedTo tell this story, I’ve lettered the primary interest areas on image above. First, an external mold is an impression of the exterior of an organism. In this case we have a triangular clam with radiating ribs in its shell. The exterior of the shell with its ribs was buried in sediment and the shell dissolved, leaving the basic impression above. It is a negative relief. Please now refer to the letters for the close-up images below.

3 Bryo Anomalodonta gigantea Waynesville Franklin Co INA. At the distal end of the bivalve mold is what looks at first to be the original shell. It is calcitic, though, and we know this bivalve had an aragonitic shell. A closer look shows that this is actually the attaching surface of an encrusting bryozoan that bioimmured the original bivalve shell, which has since dissolved away. This smooth surface is the bryozoan underside; we see the characteristic zooecia (tubes holding the individual zooids) only when this surface is weathered away.

4 Borings Anomalodonta gigantea Waynesville Franklin Co INB. These tubular objects are infillings of borings (maybe Trypanites)that were cut into the original aragonitic shell of the bivalve. The tunnels of the borings were filled with fine sediment, and then the shell dissolved away, leaving these casts of the borings.

5 Inarticulate scar Anomalodonta gigantea Waynesville Franklin Co INC and D. In the middle of the external mold is this curious circular feature (C) mostly surrounded by a bryozoan (D). There was at one time a circular encruster, likely an inarticulate brachiopod like Petrocrania, that sat directly on the external mold surface. The bryozoan colony grew around but not over it because it was alive and still opening and closing its valves for feeding. The bryozoan built a vertical sheet of skeleton around it as a kind of sanitary wall. You may be able to see the other three or four structures in the top image showing brachiopod encrusters that left the building. This is an example of fossils showing us a living relationship, even if one is not longer preserved.

This fossil and its sclerobionts (hard substrate dwellers) show us that soon after the bivalve died its aragonitic shell dissolved away, leaving as evidence the external mold in the sediment, the bioimmuring bryozoan, and the boring casts. Very soon thereafter bryozoans and brachiopods encrusted the available hard substrate. This is a typical example of early aragonite dissolution on the sea floor during a Calcite Sea interval.

References:

Palmer, T.J. and Wilson, M.A. 2004. Calcite precipitation and dissolution of biogenic aragonite in shallow Ordovician calcite seas. Lethaia 37: 417-427.

Taylor, P.D. 1990. Preservation of soft-bodied and other organisms by bioimmuration—a review. Palaeontology 33: 1-17.

Taylor, P.D. and Wilson, M.A. 2003. Palaeoecology and evolution of marine hard substrate communities. Earth-Science Reviews 62: 1-103.

Wilson, M.A., Palmer, T.J. and Taylor, P.D. 1994. Earliest preservation of soft-bodied fossils by epibiont bioimmuration: Upper Ordovician of Kentucky. Lethaia 27: 269-270.

Wooster Geologist in England (again)

June 25th, 2015

1 old quarry face cotswoldsBRISTOL, ENGLAND (June 25, 2015) — Our little geological exploration of southern Britain now passes into England. Tim Palmer and I crossed the River Severn and drove to the Cotswolds to examine old quarry exposures and Medieval stonework. We are parked above in Salterley Quarry near Leckhampton Hill.

2 devils chimney leckhamptonOur theme again is Jurassic. At Leckhampton Hill we examined exposures of the Middle Jurassic Inferior Oolite. It is not, of course, inferior to anything in the modern sense. The name, originally from William Smith himself, refers to its position below the Great Oolite. This is Devil’s Chimney, a remnant of stone left from quarrying in the 19th Century.

3 fiddlers elbow hdgd and Pea GritWe stopped along a bend in a Cotswold road called Fiddler’s Elbow and found an old carbonate hardground friend in the Inferior Oolite. Borings are evident in this flat, eroded surface. Next to the hammer are pieces of the Pea Grit, a coarser facies. I want to examine the grains for microborings and encrusters.

4 Dogrose leckhamptonThis is the gorgeous dog-rose (Rosa canina, not surprisingly), which is common in the Cotswolds. It is the model for the Tudor Rose in heraldry.

5 Fiddlers elbow orchidsThese tall orchids were also abundant near our outcrops.

6 fiddlers elbow orchids closeA closer view of the orchids. When I learn the name for this plant, I’ll amend this post. [And we have one! Caroline Palmer identified the flowers as Dactylorhiza sp. Thanks, Caroline!]

7 Painswick church and yewsAt the end of the day we stopped by St. Mary’s Church in Painswick, with its distinctive churchyard and variety of building stones. The sculptured trees are English yews.

8 Tim and Painswick gravestonesThe gravestones date back to the early 18th Century, with older ledger stones inside the church.

9 Painswick church pyramid markerThe unique pyramidal tomb of the stonemason John Bryan (1716-1787). He was apparently responsible for most of the 18th Century ornate monuments in this churchyard.

10 copper markers killing lichen PainswickMany of the gravestones have copper plates affixed to their upper faces. The rain washes copper ions out of the metal and over the limestone, killing the lichens and other encrusting organisms. This leaves the lighter patch of bare limestone. Somewhere in this is a study of microbiome ecological gradients!

11 St Marys church Painswick shot divot 1643The Painswick church was the site of a 1643 battle during the English Civil War. There are numerous bullet and shot marks on the exterior stones. Tim commented on the remarkable resilience of this stone to stay coherent after almost 400 years of weathering of these pits.

National Museum Wales and its new dinosaur

June 25th, 2015

1 National Museum WalesBRIDGEND, WALES (June 25, 2015) — On our last day in Wales, Tim had an errand at the National Museum Wales in Cardiff. We took the opportunity to visit their new dinosaur exhibit with the skeleton that had been collected from an outcrop we visited earlier in the week at Lavernock Point.

2 Dino displayThe exhibit is well done. The fossil skeleton represents the first carnivorous dinosaur found in Wales, and one of the earliest Jurassic dinosaurs found anywhere.

3 Lavernock dino bonesHere are some of the bones in lower Lias limestone.

4 Dino site museum imageThis is a museum photo of the dinosaur collecting site. You may recognize the place from a previous post in this blog.

Cardiff city hallThis is Cardiff City Hall. I loved the early 20th Century architecture in this Cardiff district, but we didn’t have time to explore. It is now off to southern England for more fieldwork.

A great unconformity in South Wales

June 24th, 2015

1 Dinantian Sutton unconformity wide viewBRIDGEND, WALES (June 24, 2015) — Today Tim Palmer and I visited a famous unconformable rock plane in South Wales. I last saw it thirty years ago, when I knew a lot less about eroded, bored and encrusted surfaces. It is an unconformity between a Carboniferous limestone (High Tor Limestone, Dinantian in age) and an overlying Jurassic limestone (Sutton Stone, Hettangian, Lower Jurassic) exposed on the coast near Ogmore-By-Sea. It was most thoroughly described in 2004 by Johnson and McKerrow (Palaeontology 38: 529-541). You can see it as the surface above, with the Jurassic rocks on top of it to the right. (I know, gray rocks on gray rocks. It takes close examination to tell them apart after they both have been subjected to coastal weathering.)

2 Dinantian Sutton close viewHere is a closer view with part of the Lower Jurassic Sutton Stone broken away to show fresh material. (We didn’t do this, despite the guilty-looking hammer. The hammer is Paul Taylor’s, by the way. Thanks, Paul!) Note the pebbles in the Sutton Stone. They are made of the Carboniferous limestone beneath. Classic unconformity.

3 Dinantian Sutton borings wide viewThe Carboniferous limestone is punctured by numerous small borings (Trypanites) drilled by filter-feeding worms of some kind when the Early Jurassic sea covered this surface. They are the clusters of small black dots shown above.

4 Dinantian Sutton borings closeIn this closer view of the borings you can see that they are filled with a lighter Jurassic sediment. The openings have been somewhat enlarged by weathering.

5 Dinantian Sutton reliefThis erosion surface shows some relief, probably formed by cobbles and pebbles washing over it during the Early Jurassic. This matches what we see on modern wave-cut rocky platforms.

6 Triassic Dinantian unconformityOn the same stretch of shoreline there is a small section where Triassic wadi deposits cut down into the Carboniferous limestone — another even more dramatic unconformity, but without marine fossils.

7 Triassic wadi deposits Ogmore by seaComing from a desert myself, I have an affinity for wadi sediments. They are coarse, angular and poorly sorted. These grains are entirely from the underlying Carboniferous limestone. They were likely generated from steep rocky canyons through which intermittent streams flowed.

8 Nash Point viewAt the end of the day Tim and I visited Nash Point, again on the coast of South Wales. Here the Lias is brilliantly (and dangerously!) exposed as a series of alternating limestones and shales.

9 Nash Point CliffWe didn’t get too close to these unstable cliffs. The limestone blocks fall often as the interbedded soft shales holding them in place weather away.

10 Nash PointA view of Nash Point at low tide. Tim always wears that red jacket, so he’s easy to spot. (Classic Redcoat!)

11 Nash Point cobblesWe didn’t find much to paleontologically interest us at this last outcrop, but it was beautiful on another stunning coastal day. These cobbles, all made of Lias limestones, are pretty to look at, but tiresome to walk through. We were ready for a slow dinner after this excellent day.

 

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