Final day at The Natural History Museum … and one more Jurassic snuff-box

June 17th, 2016

1 Chandler snuff-box cutLondon, England — My last day in London was spent working on GSA abstracts and examining one last ferruginous oncoid (“snuff-box”) from the Jurassic (Bajocian) of southern England. Bob Chandler donated to the cause a large discoidal snuff-box. We cut it (cross-section through the center shown above) and revealed its intricate internal structure.

2 Chandler snuff-box nucleusThe typical limestone nucleus is smaller than I expected, but it still shows typical features such as bioerosion.

3 Snuff-box horn 061716This specimen has beautifully-developed “horns” around the periphery. They are made of laminae not connected to the central cortex. Paul Taylor suggested that they form when the snuff-box is no long being moved about. Nice specimen. Cassidy Jester (’17) will have much to figure out in her Independent Study focused on these objects.

I’ve had a great and productive time on this expedition to England. Thank you again to my amigos Tim Palmer and Paul Taylor, as well as John Whicher, Bob Chandler and Consuelo Sendino. Science marches on.

Addendum: This is the way I like my Tube stations — empty! Take me home, District Line to Paddington. Saturday, June 18, 5:08 a.m.

Fulham Broadway tube station at 0508

Wooster’s Fossils of the Week: Symbiotic interactions in the Silurian of Baltica

June 17th, 2016

EcclimadictyonThis week’s fossils are from work Olev Vinn (University of Tartu, Estonia) and I did last summer that is soon to appear in the journal Lethaia. (An early electronic version of the manuscript has been available since November.) After numerous smaller studies describing symbiotic relationships recorded in Silurian fossils in the paleocontinent Baltica, we wrote a summary paper under Olev’s leadership. All the images are take by Olev and in the paper itself. I love this kind of study because it is about fossils as living, interacting organisms, not just static sets of characteristics.

For example, the top image is of the stromatoporoid Ecclimadictyon astrolaxum (a kind of hard sponge) with embedded rugosan corals (Palaeophyllum, with arrows) from the Jaagarahu Formation (Sheinwoodian) exposed at Abula cliff, Saaremaa Island, Estonia. The stromatoporoid and corals were growing together, each having their particular needs met and maybe even enhanced by the other.
syringoporidThe network of holes in this stromatoporoid from the Paadla Formation (Ludfordian) of Katri cliff, Saaremaa, represent the corallites of a syringoporid coral. Again, the coral and sponge formed an intergrown association.
ChaetosalpinxThis is a thin-section view of what was likely a soft-bodied worm (represented by Chaetosalpinx sibiriensis, noted by a white arrow) embedded in the tabulate coral Paleofavosites cf. collatatus from the Muksha Subformation (Homerian), Bagovitsa A, Podolia, Ukraine. Again, the worm was embedded in the living tissues of the host.

We found 13 such symbiotic associations in the Silurian of Baltica. Most of these interactions involved large skeletal organisms like stromatoporoids and corals, which provided stable hosts for smaller sessile filter-feeders and micro-predators. This work is part of a larger study looking at evolutionary trends in symbiotic associations during the Paleozoic.

References:

Tapanila, L. 2005. Palaeoecology and diversity of endosymbionts in Palaeozoic marine invertebrates: trace fossil evidence. Lethaia 38: 89–99.

Vinn, O. and Wilson, M.A. 2016. Symbiotic interactions in the Silurian of Baltica. Lethaia 49: 413–420.

Vinn, O., Wilson, M.A. and Motus, M.-A. 2014. Symbiotic endobiont biofacies in the Silurian of Baltica. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 404: 24–29.

Research in a paleontological paradise

June 16th, 2016

1 NHM front 061616London, England — If any center of scientific research can be sacred, the Natural History Museum of London is a holy of holies for paleontology. Its deep history, highly skilled researchers and staff, and magnificent architecture makes it a very special place. As I wrote before, it is a secular cathedral of science, particularly life science.

2 NHM cathedral of scienceIt is no accident the design of this building reflects a place of worship. Who do you think the white figure on the raised platform in the center is? He might as well be sitting on the altar.

3 Darwin presidingOf course! A portrait on Darwin’s upper left, not visible here and probably rarely noticed, is of his colleague Alfred Russel Wallace.

4 Darwin's NHM viewThis is Darwin’s view of the main hall and entrance of the museum. Six million visitors per year pass under his gaze.

5 Paul and SEM 061616This morning Paul and I worked with a scanning electron microscope to study particular fossils we had set aside for closer examination. Paul is the best scanning electron microscopist I have met.

6 SEM stageThis is the open stage and chamber of the SEM, with a brachiopod fixed in place by Paul for scanning. It is a complicated apparatus that can move the specimen in almost all directions in a vacuum under the electron beam.

7 Cortex pdt19574The first specimen we worked with was one of the Jurassic snuff-boxes. This is part of Cassidy Jester’s Independent Study project and her continuing research with Tim Palmer and me. Paul and I are mystified by the pattern we see here in the cortex of the snuff-box.

8 Ooid pdt19575These are two ferruginous ooids embedded in the cortex of the snuff-box. They show exactly the same mysterious irregular platy objects. Tim Palmer suggests they may be limonite, which is amorphous (without crystals). We’ll test that idea later with mineralogical and elemental analysis.

9 Jeffrey Thompson at NHM 061616I was delighted to see my friend Jeffrey Thompson in the palaeontology section doing research for his dissertation at the University of Southern California. He made an earlier appearance in this blog when he was just a kid.

10 Oscar Mmari and Jubilate Lema in LondonFor lunch I met my former student and veteran of an Independent Study field trip to Israel Oscar Mmari (on the left) and fellow Wooster graduate Jubilate Lema on the right. Both of these young Tanzanians are now making their way in the world. Oscar starts this fall at Imperial College, and Jubilate is an economist working with an investment firm in Johannesburg, South Africa. We had a delightful meal and walk around the museum neighborhood.

11 Dinner view 061616My long day ended with an excellent dinner with Paul and Patricia Taylor at the Swan Restaurant along the Thames River. This was our view from the table. This will all seem a dream in just two days time.

 

Another day of research at The Natural History Museum, London

June 15th, 2016

1 Mapped brach 061516London, England — I spent most of my museum time today at a keyboard, but in a splendid and collegial setting. Very productive and stimulating conversations with Paul Taylor and Consuelo Sendino, but mostly screen time. I drew little map boxes on a brachiopod, for example, as shown above.

2 Screen Shot 2016-06-15 at 2.23.30 PMI also used Image J to measure cell sizes, as shown in the above screen shot. More on what this is about tomorrow.

3 Winchendon Road viewFinally, I thought I’d share the view from my attic window of Winchendon Street. I think I hear and see every flight in and out of Heathrow!

4 London helicopterIncluding police helicopters. Often.

A day at the Natural History Museum in London

June 14th, 2016

1 Drawer of brachiopodsLondon, England — My first full day at The Natural History Museum in London was interesting and inspiring as always, but it did have its tedium. This drawer of Ordovician brachiopods, for example. I scanned each with my handlens in the dim lighting looking for a particular kind of encruster.

2 Drawers of brachiopodsDrawer after drawer. Saw many curious fossils, but not one example of what I was looking for. Not an uncommon experience!

3 Harry photographing 061416One of the best parts of a museum visit is meeting skilled staff. Harry Taylor is a master photographer of fossils. Paul Taylor and I took him a fossil this morning and he immediately created a superb image for our work. In my inexpert photograph above, what looks like a blast furnace behind the camera is his lighting and flash system.

4 Harry Paul photographyHarry and Paul discuss the image on screen.

5 Bryo copyHere is a small version of the final result of Harry’s artistry. The original file is 111 megabytes! This is a brachiopod (Rafinesquina ponderosa) from the Cincinnatian rocks of southern Ohio. It is encrusted with something special I’ll describe in a later post. We’ll use this high-resolution image for detailed mapping of this surface.

6 Emanuela Di Martino SEM 061416Paul and I visited our colleague Emanuela Di Martino to congratulate her on Italy’s recent win in the Euro 2016 football tournament. She is operating the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) Paul and I will be using in two days. I’ve sat here for many hours scanning specimens with Paul.

7 Tony Wighton cuttingPaul and I had a bryozoan we wanted to cut in half to study its interior. Tony Wighton immediately sliced it for us.

8 Tony Wighton polishingTony then gave each half a mirror finish, producing spectacular specimens that considerably enhance the value of the collections.

It was a good day at the museum. The rain stopped long enough for us to get fresh hamburgers at the nearby open market for lunch, and then we had drinks at the Victoria & Albert Museum next door. I don’t take any of this for granted!

Team Dorset in transit

June 13th, 2016

1 Bristol station 061316Bristol to London, England — Cassidy Jester (’17) and I returned to the Bristol train station (above) on our way to London. We grabbed a smidgen of geology along the way:

2 Bristol station stoneThis common stone in the train station looked familiar. It turns out to be the same Triassic wadi deposit I saw with Tim Palmer in Wales last year. The gray clasts in this breccia are from the Carboniferous Limestone.

3 Cassidy in Bristol StationHere is Cassidy ready to board the train for London. All her fieldwork is done and she is soon to be off exploring England, Scotland and Wales with her boyfriend. Nice job, Cassidy!

4 NHM from Exhibition RoadHere is my destination in London: the fantastic Natural History Museum, seen here from Exhibition Road. A cathedral of science.

5 Paul in his office 061316And the mighty Paul Taylor sits in the heart of the museum, surrounded by bryozoans. He has been my very good friend since 1985. I am fortunate again this summer to work with Paul and Tim Palmer — the Three Amigos for 31 years. I will also be working this week with Consuelo Sendino.

6 66 Winchendon RoadFinally, here are my lodgings at 66 Winchendon Road, Fulham, London. I’ve rented the top room (with the roof windows) for the week I’m here.

Wooster Geologists explore Bristol, England

June 12th, 2016

1 Temple Church interior 585Bristol, England — Cassidy Jester (’17) and I spent the day in Bristol as we await our trip to London tomorrow. We began a rainy, gray morning in the harbor region in museums and historical ships. We were turned away from the Cathedral because it was, naturally enough, Sunday morning. We did get a peek at the finery and costumes of people attending a special service for the Queen’s Pretend 90th Birthday. (Her real birthday being in April. Royals get an extra birthday of their choice, apparently.) From our diverse visits today, I want to present two short pictorials.

Above is an interior view of Temple Church in the Redcliffe district of Bristol, about a block from our hotel. The weather had much improved by the afternoon. Tim Palmer introduced me to this site last year.  This building has been in ruins since the night of November 24, 1940.

2 Temple Church 1940German bombers, during the Bristol Blitz, dropped incendiary bombs on the roof of Temple Church, starting a fire that collapsed the roof, damaged the arcades, and destroyed all the wood furnishings. The building was effectively destroyed, but the ruins were not only left standing, they were reinforced against further collapse.

3 Temple Church 1This is a view of the eastern wall showing the skeletal remains.

4 Temple Church 2The surviving tower.

5 Templar Church in Temple ChurchIn an interesting twist, after the destruction, archaeologists were able to dig into the foundations of Temple Church. The tradition was that the original church building was round. Indeed, round outlines appeared, along with column remnants of a monastery built in the early 12th century by the Order of the Knights Templar. This was a Templar Church in their traditional style evoking the Temple in Jerusalem. Only nine of these round churches were built in England.

6 Queen Square 061216Another site that impressed me was Queen Square. In the center is a statue of King William III (William of Orange, “King Billy”, and the William of “William and Mary”). The square was lively today with a refugee relief concert.

7 Queen Square 1831This is Queen Square on a hot night in 1831. The statue of King Billy has lots of company. Queen Square was the epicenter of the 1831 Bristol Riot over the rejection of a Reform Bill by the House of Lords. At that time only 6000 men of the population of 104,000 were franchised. There was great violence and much destruction that had a deep effect on the nation. The Reform Act was passed the next year.

Two brief Bristol stories!

 

Wooster Geologists in Bristol, England

June 11th, 2016

1 Bristol Museum and UniversityBristol, England — Cassidy Jester (’17) and I are spending the weekend in Bristol after finishing our fieldwork in Dorset this week. Our travel and lodging arrangements required a couple of days here before we go to London on Monday and then our separate ways. We’ll continue to sort out our specimens, work on a GSA abstract, and explore the city. This afternoon, while waiting for our hotel rooms to open, we walked through the central part of the city to the Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery. It is the building with the pillars on the left. The magnificent tall building on the right is part of the University of Bristol — the part that houses the Earth Sciences Department.

2 Bristol City Museum and Art GalleryThis museum is a wonderful combination of art, history and science, with considerable space devoted to geology and paleontology.

3 Bristol pregnant ichthyosaurAmong the many exhibits, I picked one to share: a pregnant ichthyosaur from the local Jurassic. Note the tiny arrow in the lower left of the skeleton.

4 Bristol ichthyosaur fetusAt the arrow, among the bones of this female ichthyosaur is this hand-sized skeleton of a fetus, direct evidence that ichthyosaurs, though reptiles, gave live birth. Paleontology is so cool.

Team Dorset finishes its fieldwork

June 10th, 2016

1 Snuffbox serpulidssSherborne, England — Cassidy Jester (’17), Tim Palmer and I today finished our fieldwork. Cassidy is now set for her Senior Independent Study project with plenty of specimens, observations, photographs and ideas to last the next 10 months. This morning we visited the Burton Bradstock beach exposure of the snuffboxes, meeting our great colleague Caroline Buttler (Department of Natural Sciences, Amgueddfa Cymru – National Museum Wales, Cardiff) and her husband Simon for lunch on the outcrop. It was great fun, and Caroline had additional discoveries for us, including the exfoliated snuffbox layer shown above with serpulid worm tubes.

2 Ammonite gastropod snuffboxesWe had time to look for more fossils associated with the snuffboxes. Above you see a gastropod on the left and an ammonite on the right, with snuffbox bits scattered about.

3 Burton Bradstock pendentWe also found many examples of burrow systems with cryptic pendent iron-rich layers, including those shown above. (I rotated the image 180° because the block we studied on the beach is upside-down.)

4 Maiden Castle rampartsOn the way back to our lodgings near Sherborne we stopped by the Iron Age hill fort Maiden Castle, a portion of the massive earthen ramparts of which are shown above.

Our collecting, measuring and describing is done. Most of the work for this project, of course, will be in the Wooster geology labs. We will have delightful memories of our sunny days in Dorset, and the invaluable assistance of our colleagues Bob Chandler and John Whicher. I am personally most grateful for the geological and navigational skills of Tim Palmer, our wonderful companion and astute advisor. Without him none of this could be done.

Crew in Whicher MuseumThe Dorset crew in the Whicher Museum. From the left, Bob Chandler, Mark Wilson, Tim Palmer, John Whicher, nd Cassidy Jester (’17).

Wooster’s Fossil of the Week: A fracture-shaped bioerosion trace from the Pliocene of Cyprus

June 10th, 2016

Caedichnus_01_scale_Mark 500This past semester I worked with three colleagues on a massive trace fossil review paper, which we hope meets success in the next month or so. My primary job on the team was to sort out bioerosion traces, especially those that are macroscopic. As always with such studies, I learned a great deal when forced to do a systematic literature review. One of the ichnogenera new to me was Caedichnus, a wedge-shaped excision found primarily in gastropod shells. It was only described last year by Stafford et al. (2015). Above is an example we happened to have in our collections. Note the fractured margins in this Fusinus shell aperture from the Pliocene of Cyprus. It was likely made by a predatory crustacean (such as a crab or lobster) bashing away at the shell to get to the living snail inside. The predator may have been successful in this case since there is no sign of healing in the snail shell.
Fusinus Cyprus Pliocene 500Above is an undamaged Fusinus showing a complete aperture. This snail also had its travails, though. Note the round, incomplete borehole just above the aperture. This was made by some kind of drilling predator, likely a naticid snail.

These shells come from the 1996 Wooster-Keck expedition to Cyprus with Steve Dornbos (’97) and me. Like the rest of the Cypriot specimens on this blog, it is from the Nicosia Formation (Pliocene) exposed on the Mesaoria Plain in the center of the island. This specimen comes from the “Exploration” locality described in Dornbos and Wilson (1999).

References:

Dornbos, S.Q. and Wilson, M.A. 1999. Paleoecology of a Pliocene coral reef in Cyprus: Recovery of a marine community from the Messinian Salinity Crisis. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie, Abhandlungen 213: 103-118.

Molinaro, D.J., Stafford, E.S., Collins, B.M., Barclay, K.M., Tyler, C.L. and Leighton, L.R. 2014. Peeling out predation intensity in the fossil record: A test of repair scar frequency as a suitable proxy for predation pressure along a modern predation gradient. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 412: 141-147.

Stafford, E.S., Dietl, G.P., Gingras, M.P. and Leighton, L.R. 2015. Caedichnus, a new ichnogenus representing predatory attack on the gastropod shell aperture. Ichnos 22: 87-102.

Stafford, E.S., Tyler, C.L. and Leighton, L.R. 2015. Gastropod shell repair tracks predator abundance. Marine Ecology 36: 1176-1184.

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