New publication on an Alaskan glacier – coauthored by a Wooster student, staff and faculty member

June 11th, 2019

Dr. Ben Gaglioti (Lamont-Doherty Tree Ring Lab and University of Alaska – Fairbanks) just published an article entitled: Timing and Potential Causes of 19th-Century Glacier Advances in Coastal Alaska Based on Tree-Ring Dating and Historical Accounts. Three of the coauthors include Wooster Earth Scientists and Tree Ring Lab workers,¬†Josh Charlton (’19), Nick Wiesenberg (Department technician) and Dr. Wiles (Earth Sciences faculty). This contribution describes the Little Ice Glacier History of LaPerouse Glacier on the outer coast of Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve.

Dr Gaglioti did a great job putting together the glacial chronology for the site, and then coming up with some new ideas explaining why this glacier advanced to its Holocene maximum between CE 1850 and 1890. This was a time when it was not as cold as some other times within this broad interval (~ CE 1250-1850) we call the Little Ice Age. Dr. Gaglioti draws on some new and not-so-new proxy records that show a strengthening of the Aleutian Low over the past several 100 years and he suggests that the cooler summer temperatures aided by increased winter snowfall forced this glacier to its maximum extent. His methods and presentation in this paper are new and provide some excellent possibilities for future work by Wooster students. We look forward to continuing our collaboration with Dr. Gaglioti.

The photos below are from Dr. Gaglioti and show (top) the location of the glacier, (middle) the setting of the buried forest he discovered, and (bottom) what the amazing pristine trees look like as the ice retreats. Within this buried forest is also the first Alaskan Cedar paleo-forest that has been discovered. Here is a link to a National Geographic sponsored blog describing some of the field work. Special thanks to Lauren Oakes for her excellent blog. The project was partially supported by the National Geographic Society, the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the National Science Foundation.

 

 

3 Responses to “New publication on an Alaskan glacier – coauthored by a Wooster student, staff and faculty member”

  1. Mark Wilsonon 12 Jun 2019 at 2:09 am

    Congratulations on the paper, Tree-Ring Lab people! That buried forest is a textbook case.

  2. Meagen Pollockon 13 Jun 2019 at 9:05 pm

    Congratulations! Well done, Wooster Tree Ring Lab!

  3. acrawfordon 21 Jun 2019 at 9:11 am

    Those are great photos, Greg. And I really like the clear ecological succession visible on the left of the middle photo. There’s a brownish strip in the trees in the lower photo — is that a die-off of some kind?

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