Archive for June 11th, 2019

New publication on an Alaskan glacier – coauthored by a Wooster student, staff and faculty member

June 11th, 2019

Dr. Ben Gaglioti (Lamont-Doherty Tree Ring Lab and University of Alaska – Fairbanks) just published an article entitled: Timing and Potential Causes of 19th-Century Glacier Advances in Coastal Alaska Based on Tree-Ring Dating and Historical Accounts. Three of the coauthors include Wooster Earth Scientists and Tree Ring Lab workers, Josh Charlton (’19), Nick Wiesenberg (Department technician) and Dr. Wiles (Earth Sciences faculty). This contribution describes the Little Ice Glacier History of LaPerouse Glacier on the outer coast of Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve.

Dr Gaglioti did a great job putting together the glacial chronology for the site, and then coming up with some new ideas explaining why this glacier advanced to its Holocene maximum between CE 1850 and 1890. This was a time when it was not as cold as some other times within this broad interval (~ CE 1250-1850) we call the Little Ice Age. Dr. Gaglioti draws on some new and not-so-new proxy records that show a strengthening of the Aleutian Low over the past several 100 years and he suggests that the cooler summer temperatures aided by increased winter snowfall forced this glacier to its maximum extent. His methods and presentation in this paper are new and provide some excellent possibilities for future work by Wooster students. We look forward to continuing our collaboration with Dr. Gaglioti.

The photos below are from Dr. Gaglioti and show (top) the location of the glacier, (middle) the setting of the buried forest he discovered, and (bottom) what the amazing pristine trees look like as the ice retreats. Within this buried forest is also the first Alaskan Cedar paleo-forest that has been discovered. Here is a link to a National Geographic sponsored blog describing some of the field work. Special thanks to Lauren Oakes for her excellent blog. The project was partially supported by the National Geographic Society, the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the National Science Foundation.

 

 

Wooster Geologist in the High Tatras Mountains of northern Slovakia

June 11th, 2019

Bratislava, Slovakia — Today our continuing IBA field trip adventure started in the High Tatra Mountains at this spectacular glacial lake called Štrbské pleso. This is  very popular ski destination in central Europe. The sharp mountain peaks are granitic.

Another view of Štrbské pleso.

This was our modernistic hotel near Štrbské pleso. Excellent views.

We stopped for a tour of Bojnice Castle after leaving the mountains. It has essentially been built and rebuilt since the 11th century and is currently popular in films and weddings needing a fairy-tale castle background. It is ostentatious, of course, with ridiculous sums of money spent by generations of aristocrats to encrust it with gold and artworks.

The castle didn’t impress me, but the fact that it overlies a natural cavern did!

I like my castles in dramatic ruins, and Beckov Castle in western Slovakia  fits that bill well. The castle sits on a limestone klippe, which is an erosional remnant of a thrust sheet.

We went way, way high up through the ruins to the castle’s top.

The bedrock is integrated into the castle walls, as we’ve seen often.

This was the last stop of the day before we reached Bratislava and our next hotel.