Archive for April 29th, 2016

Wooster Geologists in the 2016 Wooster Senior Research Symposium

April 29th, 2016

Michael Williams 042916WOOSTER, OHIO–A dozen Wooster Geologists participated today in the annual Wooster Senior Research Symposium: A Celebration of Independent Study! All did superb presentations that were very well received. The geology portion began in the morning with talks from Team Utah 3.0, led by Dr. Meagen Pollock and Dr. Shelley Judge. Michael Williams (’16) gave his talk entitled “Emplacement Processes and Monogenetic Classification of Ice Springs Volcanic Field, Central Utah”. Here’s a link to Michael’s field work.

Kelli Baxstrom 042916Kelli Baxstrom (’16) also spoke for Team Utah with her talk entitled: “Ice Springs Volcanic Field: New Insights and History for a Series of Complex Eruptions”. Here’s a link to Kelli’s field work.

Maddie Happ 042916Maddie Happ (’16) had a poster entitled: “Investigating Blue Light Intensity in Tree Rings to Generate High-Sensitivity Summer Temperature Records for Southern Alaska”. Here’s a link to Maddie’s field work.

Mae Kemsley 042916Mae Kemsley (’16) presented: “An isotopic analysis of belemnites from the Speeton Clay Formation (Lower Cretaceous) of Filey Bay, North Yorkshire, England”. Here’s a link to Mae’s field work.

Meredith Mann 042916Meredith Mann (’16) gave a poster entitled: “Paleoecology and Depositional Environments of the Passage Beds Member at Filey Brigg (Upper Jurassic, North Yorkshire, England)”. Here’s a link to Meredith’s field work.

Dan Misinay 042916Dan Misinay (’16) presented: “Late Holocene Glacial History of Muir Inlet, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska”. Here’s a link to Dan’s field work.

Brittany Nicholson 042916Brittany Nicholson (’16) gave a poster entitled: “Mentoring Structures in Undergraduate Research”.

Eric Parker 042916Eric Parker (’16) presented: “Analysis of Water Quality Parameters and Preliminary Investigation into the Impacts of Human Access on the Water Quality of the Nisqually River, Mount Rainier National Park”.

Krysden Schantz 042916Krysden Schantz (’16) gave: “The Use of Multiple Dating Methods to Determine the Age of Basalt in the Ice Springs Volcanic Field, Millard County, Utah”. Here’s a link to Krysden’s field work.

Adam Silverstein 042916Adam Silverstein (’16) presented: “Regional Volcanic Extinction as a Mechanism for Subsidence in the Vatnsdalur Structural Basin, Skagi Peninsula, Northwest Iceland”. You can find Adam in Iceland in this post.

Kaitlin Starr 042916Kaitlin Starr (’16) is a double major in studio art and geology. Maybe we shouldn’t have been surprised to see her double-booked for the same time slot at the symposium. Her geology I.S. thesis poster was titled: “Reconstructing Glacial History from Forests Preserved in the Wake of the Catastrophic Retreating Columbia and Wooster Glaciers, Prince William Sound, Alaska”. Here’s a link to Kaitlin’s field work. She is shown above with her art exhibit: “Exploring the Unknown: A Ceramic Journey Through the Sea of Imagination”. She made fantastical representations of marine creatures that do not exist but look eerily like beautiful fossils.

Kaitlin Kreation III call them Kaitlin’s Kreations, and think they’re wonderful!

Congratulations on your successful Independent Study projects, Wooster Seniors!

Wooster’s Fossil of the Week: A terebratulid brachiopod from the Middle Jurassic of northwestern France

April 29th, 2016

1 Cererithyris arkelli Almeras 1970 dorsal 585We have another beautiful brachiopod this week from our friend Mr. Clive Champion in England. He sent me a surprise package of fossils earlier this year. They are very much appreciated by me and my students!

The specimen above is Cererithyris arkelli Almeras, 1970, from the Bathonian (Middle Jurassic) of Ranville, Calvados, France. (Ranville, by the way, was the first village liberated in France on D-Day.) It is a terebratulid brachiopod, which we have seen before on this blog from the Miocene of Spain and the Triassic of Israel. They have the classic brachiopod form. The image above shows the dorsal valve with the posterior of the ventral valve housing the round hole for the fleshy stalk (pedicle) it had in life.
2 Cererithyris arkelli Almeras 1970 sideThis is a side view of C. arkelli. The dorsal valve is on the top; the ventral valve on the bottom. It is from this perspective that brachiopods were called “lamp shells” because they resemble Roman oil lamps.
3 Cererithyris arkelli Almeras 1970 ventralThis is the ventral view of the specimen. These brachiopods are remarkably smooth.
4 William_Joscelyn_ArkellCererithyris arkelli was named by Almeras (1970) in honor of William Joscelyn Arkell (1904–1958). Arkell was an English geologist who essentially became Dr. Jurassic during the middle part of the 20th Century. I’m shocked to see that with all his publications, awards and accomplishments, he died when he was only 54 years old.

W.J. Arkell grew up in Wiltshire, the seventh child of a wealthy father (a partner in the family-owned Arkell’s Brewery) and artist mother (Laura Jane Arkell). He enjoyed nature as a child, winning essay contests on his observations of natural history in his native county and south on the Dorset coast. Arkell was unusually tall for his age (6 feet 4.5 inches by age 17.5 years in an unusually detailed note) and was considered to have “outgrown his strength”. Nature and writing were escapes from athletic events. He also published poems.

Arkell attended New College, Oxford University, intending to become an entomologist, but Julian Huxley was his tutor and he quickly adopted geology and paleontology. Eventually he earned a PhD at Oxford in 1928, concentrating his research on Corallian (Upper Jurassic) bivalves of England. As a side project, he published work on Paleolithic human skeletons from northern Egypt.

Oxford suited Arkell, so he stayed there as a research fellow, expanding his research to the entire Jurassic System of Great Britain, then Europe, and then the world. His work became the standard for understanding Jurassic geology and paleontology for decades.

After World War II (in which he served in the Ministry of Transport), Arkell took a senior research position at Trinity College and the Sedgwick Museum, Cambridge University, continuing his work on the Jurassic. He travelled often, including long stints in the Middle East. His health was never good, though, and he had a stroke in 1956, and died after a second stroke in 1958.

During his career Arkell received the Mary Clark Thompson Medal from the National Academy of Sciences in the USA, a Fellowship in the Royal Society, the Lyell Medal from the Geological Society of London, and the Leopold von Buch medal from the German Geological Society.

References:

Almeras, Y. 1970. Les Terebratulidae du Dogger dans le Mâconnais, le Mont dʼOr lyonnais et le Jura méridional. Étude systématique et biostratigraphique. Rapports avec la paléoécologie. Documents des Laboratoires de Géologie Lyon, 39, 3 vol.: 1-690.

Arkell, W.J. 1956. Jurassic Geology of the World. New York; Edinburgh: Hafner Publishing Co; Oliver & Boyd; 806 pp.

Cox, L.R. 1958. William Joscelyn Arkell 1904-1958. Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society 4: 1.

Rousselle, L. and Chavanon, S. 1981. Le genre Cererithyris (Brachiopodes, Terebratulidae) dans le Bajocien supérieur et le Bathonien des Hauts-Plateaux du Maroc oriental. CR somm. Soc. Géol France, 1981: 89-92.