Archive for March 19th, 2016

A geological obstacle course in Ada Canyon, southern Israel

March 19th, 2016

1 Ada canyon startMITZPE RAMON, ISRAEL — As part of our Shabbat trip today, Yoav Avni wanted to take me up Ada Canyon (N30.32973°, E34.91417°) to explore the Hazeva (Miocene) and Arava (Pleistocene). He cryptically said, “There will be places we can barely get through”. True, that. Above is Yoav at the start of the hike. Turns out this is a slot canyon with challenges.

2 Arava narrows begin“The narrow part begins”, he says helpfully.

3 Narrowing AravaAt this point I have to take off my pack to reduce my sideways width.

4 Narrow AravaAnd sideways with a twist is the only way through as the walls close in. Pro tip: Never do this when it is raining.

5 Problematic Arava sectionNow it gets problematic with boulder scrambling and claustrophobia.

6 First ladder aravaA ladder! I never did mention my aching shoulder.

7 Second ladder AravaSteps cut in the rock and then a second ladder. Going down is always easier than going up, right?

8 Rope climb AravaA knotted rope to climb the cliff! Note the shadow of successful me at the top of the last obstacle. Wondering, though, what these climbs are like on the way back.

9 Ada view 031916The view at the top of the mountain, though, really was spectacular. This is a view towards Be’er Ada, with the fault described in the previous post running diagonally across the background.

10 Hazeva cobbles 585And yes, the geology along the way! It was very impressive. The Hazeva Formation is mostly sandstone with some layers of sandy conglomerate as in the above image. It was deposited in a wetlands with occasional floods (which produced the coarse layers). The cobbles are rounded cherts derived from Jordan to the east.

11 Arava faciesThe Arava Formation was deposited in a desert much like what we see today. It is interbedded gravels (from wadis) and unconsolidated silts (from playas and saline lakes). Classic sed/strat material. It was all well worth the adventure for this aging geologist!

 

A Shabbat trip to Be’er Ada in the southern Negev

March 19th, 2016

1 Road to Beer AdaMITZPE RAMON, ISRAEL — Yoav Avni and I have a tradition on Shabbat. We drive somewhere to explore interesting geology and history unconnected to current projects. It’s not really work — it’s geotourism. We are, though, always talking about new ideas. Today we traveled south of Mitzpe Ramon into the “deep desert” of the Arava below the Negev Highlands.

2 MR view to JordanThe morning view south across Makhtesh Ramon was spectacular. It isn’t conveyed very well through an image only 585 pixels wide, but it is a perspective of unusual clarity. The purple streak at the top represents mountains in western Jordan. The haze just below them is in the Arava Valley. We are looking across most of the Negev.

3 Acacia grove Beer AdaOur mission today was to visit Be’er Ada (Bir Abu ‘Auda), an historic well, and the geology around it. (N30.32229°, E34.90701°, if you’re following at home.) The top image on this post is a view from the road to the well. Just above is a grove of acacia trees near the well. The abundance of these trees, and their good health, is an indication of accessible water.

4 Yoav at Beer AdaHere is Yoav peering down into Be’er Ada. (“Be’er” means well.) It is at least twenty meters deep. The base is filled with silt, so it will have to be dug out to supply water again. This well is thousands of years old and has been a critical watering spot in the Negev for traveling groups. The next nearest well is to the east about 40 km away. Another 40 km or so to the west is another well. Be’er Ada was active as late as the 1950s, and likely had sporadic use afterwards. The water here accumulates on the impermeable clays of the Taqiya Formation (Paleocene).

5 Acacia outcrop view 031916This is a view from near Be’er Ada to the main geological interest for me: the the orangish Hazeva Formation (Miocene) topped unconformably by the gray Pleistocene Arava Formation. We will spend much more intimate time with these units in the next post. Note the graceful acacia trees.

6 Beer Ada faultThis area is next to a complex fault system. On the left is a down-dropped block of Hazeva and Arava, with Cretaceous rocks on the right. The fault is also part of the reason for the subterranean water resources at Be’er Ada.

7 Ada profileIn the middle of the image is an example of the pareidolia so common in stark landscapes. Some people see a face in profile. Apparently tour guides like to call this the head of “Ada” for whom the well was named. However, there never was such a woman!

Note the excellent weather in these images. A perfect Negev day! Thank you to Yoav for being such a generous host.