Archive for March 18th, 2016

At some point you must start collecting data

March 18th, 2016

1 Acacia at Meredith SectionMITZPE RAMON, ISRAEL — Today my friend Yoav Avni (Geological Survey of Israel) and I returned to Makhtesh Gadol to pursue a project with Subunit 65 of the Matmor Formation (Callovian, Middle Jurassic). You may recall this limestone contains an extraordinary bedding plane of fossils preserved in near-life positions (as seen in a recent Fossil of the Week entry). Yoav’s job was to find additional exposures of this subunit in the area; mine was to map the distribution of fossils on the bedding plane. This area of the makhtesh, by the way, is called “Meredith’s Section” after IS student Meredith Sharpe, who did splendid work here. The acacia tree above is our traditional lunch spot (when the camels aren’t using it).

2 SU65 bedding plane 031816This is the bedding plane of Subunit 65. I went over every square centimeter of it photographically mapping and detailing it with a square-meter quadrat. It was hot work, and a bit of drudgery compared to the previous days of exploring new exposures.

3 SU65 quadrat 031816This is a typical quadrat, complete with my boot toes. I took 41 quadrat photos like this, and then detailed the fossils within and their positions. In the meantime, Yoav wandered the hills and found many excellent exposures of the same unit, although none with a bedding plane like this. We will be able to compare the fossils in the “traditional” exposures with what we see here.

That’s pretty much it for my day in the desert!

Wooster’s Fossils of the Week: A Jurassic seafloor assemblage

March 18th, 2016

1 DSC_0184 copyImages from fieldwork this week. These are all fossils exposed on a single bedding plane in the Matmor Formation (Middle Jurassic, Callovian) exposed in Makhtesh Gadol. I found them many years ago while working through the stratigraphy near the top of the formation. They present a vignette of life in a shallow carbonate Jurassic sea. They are so well preserved you can almost feel the gentle waves and hear the squawks of the pterosaurs wheeling above. In the top image we have my favorite of the set: A gastropod shell in the middle surrounded by mytilid bivalves. The bivalves were no doubt attached to the gastropod by their thin byssal threads, holding them in place in the choppy waters. The preservation is remarkable. All these shells are calcitized, but retain their ornamentation. They are exposed on a bank of a wadi, and so they have been lightly etched from the matrix by sandy water during floods.

2 DSC_0180 copyJust to show the gastropod-bivalve association is not a fluke of preservation, here’s another set. On this bedding plane are four such assemblages.

3 DSC_0178 copyHere’s another gastropod, this one with heavy spines.

4 DSC_0179 copyA high-spired gastropod is on the left, with a mytilid in side-view on the right.

5 DSC_0181 copyAnother gastropod to end the set. These are just a few of the many such fossils exposed on this bedding plane of the Matmor Formation.