Archive for July 21st, 2014

Iron Flows and Camera Blows

July 21st, 2014

Guest Bloggers:  Sarah McGrath (’17) and Chloe Wallace (’17), both members of Team Utah 2014

 

EPHRAIM, UTAH — No longer rookie bloggers Chloe and Sarah here, coming at you from the sweet comfort of our couch in Utah. Before collecting pounds of oncolites and encountering countless kill sites, we were just two inexperienced field geologists spending our long days becoming pros with the Trimble. The Trimble is a survey grade GPS unit. We used it to map the many iron concretions throughout the Six-Mile Canyon Formation. Over the course of a day and a half we were able to map over 200 points on one single rib of the outcrop.

As you will see below it takes a truly skilled and brave geologist to be worthy of the power that is the Trimble. Lesson learned: do not forget to zip the pocket that is holding your camera as you lean over a steep cliff just to collect a single data point. Thankfully, Sarah’s camera survived the fall and still works somehow. Nikons, people! Also as Sarah was retrieving her camera she came upon some lovely iron staining that otherwise would not have been discovered. There’s always an upside!

picture 6 - 585

How to Trimble 101: This isn’t your basic car GPS.

picture 7 - 585

Seconds before Sarah dropped her camera down the side of the cliff. All in the name of science!

picture 8 - 585

The iron staining Sarah came upon while retrieving her camera at the bottom of the cliff.

picture 9 - 585

We’ve gotten too used to this view. We’re going to miss Utah! Thanks for an amazing two weeks full of scalding heat, accessibility to more Peace Tea than one human should consume, and unforgettable geology.

 

 

Oncolites and Kill Sites

July 21st, 2014

Guest Bloggers:  Sarah McGrath (’17) and Chloe Wallace (’17), both members of Team Utah 2014

 

EPHRAIM, UTAH –  Rookie bloggers, Sarah and Chloe, coming at you from beautiful Ephraim, Utah! We’ll admit early on that are blogging skills are not the most proficient, but we’re giving it a shot (mostly because we are being “strongly encouraged”). We figure plenty of enticing pictures will make up for what we are lacking.

We began a new project in the field on Thursday. We gathered data and collected oncolites in the North Horn Formation. We measured over 50 oncolites within the rock face and collected about a dozen float samples. The following day we did more oncolite work, collecting at least 150 float samples, in the Flagstaff at “Snake Ridge,” which was cleverly named by Dr. Judge after countless rattlesnake sightings. Luckily for us, we have yet to see a single snake the entire trip. Knock on wood; still one day left in the field.

Although we haven’t seen any rattlesnakes, we’ve encountered enough kill sites to last us a lifetime. At our first sighting we ran away in disgust, but by our most recent kill site we were taking creative photos with them. We suspect our friend Freddy the mountain lion may be at fault.

picture 1 - 585

The view from the North Horn Formation.

picture 2 - 585

One bag out of many of the collected oncolites at the infamous “Snake Ledge.”  Note the medical tape holding one of the oncolites together!!

picture 3 - killsite

Most recent kill site shot. Maggots don’t scare us.

picture 4 - 585

More wildlife encountered in the field. This jackrabbit kept us quite entertained for at least thirty minutes.

picture 5 - 585

Possible homestead of the one and only Freddy the mountain lion.