Archive for October 15th, 2009

Minerals Outreach – Cornerstone Elementary

October 15th, 2009

Geology Club members Lashawna, Kelly, Bridget and Phil worked with two third grade classes at Cornerstone Elementary School to sharpen up the students mineral and rock identification skills.Mr. Gaut goes over the ground rules for the mineral and rock identification exercise. Lashawna looks on.
Mrs. Gaut goes over the ground rules for the mineral and rock identification exercise. Lashawna looks on.
Bridget and Kelly go over the basics of the three rock types and how they form.

Bridget and Kelly go over the basics of the three rock types and how they form.

Phil troubleshoots a mineral id by these two gentlemen.

Phil troubleshoots a mineral id by these two gentlemen.

This 3rd grader extends the concept of the streak test to coving his entire two hands in hematite.

This 3rd grader extends the concept of the streak test by covering his entire two hands in hematite.

Environmental Geology Fieldtrip – Soils/Geologic History and Groundwater

October 15th, 2009

The class at the No-Till experimental plots at the OARDC in Wooster. Stduents took soil cores from plots that were convnetionally tilled and those taht have not been tilled for 50 years. The soils and organin content in each of the soil cores clearly showed differences in soils structure and organ content

The class at the No-Till experimental plots at the OARDC in Wooster. Students took soil cores from plots that were conventionally tilled and those that have not been tilled for 50 years. The soil structure and organic content in each of the soil cores clearly showed the differences in the farming practices.

Richa took this spectacular shot of a recently-harvested soybean field. This shows the flay lake plain from Lake Killbuck and the underfit Killbuck River. The view to the north looks up the Killbuck Spillway. This field was stripped of a foot of fertile topsoil during the 1969 flood.

Richa took this spectacular shot of a recently-harvested soybean field. This shows the lake plain from Lake Killbuck and the underfit Killbuck River. The view to the north looks up the Killbuck Spillway. This field was stripped of a foot of fertile topsoil during the 1969 flood.

Rob and Palmer pose with coring device that they used to recover a sediment core from the bottom of the Killbuck River where is has downcut into the blue lake clay sediments. The blue clay is the confing layer of the Wooster buried valley aquifer.

Rob and Palmer pose with coring device that they used to recover a sediment core from the bottom of the Killbuck River where is has downcut into the blue lake clays. The blue clay is the confining layer of the Wooster buried valley aquifer.

Mike from the Wosoter water plant explains to the class the challenges of keeping Wooster's supplied with clean groundwater.

Mike from the Wooster water plant explains the challenges of keeping Wooster supplied with clean groundwater.