Archive for October 13th, 2009

Processing the Lake Core (and Tree Cores)

October 13th, 2009

Earlier posts from the Climate Change class showed the students coring trees and a lake for the various analysis described below. The goals are to examine climate in Ohio since the last Ice Age as recorded in lake sediments and to determine how various tree species respond to changes in temperature and moisture.

Kelly and Adrian finish up the European Larch tree-ring chronology. The larch trees were sampled at the Secrest Arboretum in Wooster.
Kelly and Adrian finish up the European Larch tree-ring chronology. The larch trees were sampled at the Secrest Arboretum in Wooster.

Roz and Houston photographed the A and B core in their entirety - over 25 meters of mud.  Lower down in the post are three of their photos showing the variability in the sediment core.
Roz and Houston photographed the A and B sediment core taken from Long Lake located just south of Wooster. These core is over 14 meters of mud. Lower down in the post are three of their photos showing the variability in the sediment core.
masusc
Travis and Adonis collect magnetic susceptibility data on each of the thrusts
interdisc
This interdisciplinary team of English, Archaeology, History and Geology majors pick through the mud to locate organics for radiocarbon and to identify some of the flora and fauna in the mud such as seeds, charcoal, chironomids and fly wings

The is the base of the core - Late Glacial sands and gravel - at this horizon, Lindsey and Amanda  removed a stick that has been sent out for radiocarbon analysis.
The is the base of the core – Late Glacial sands and gravel, Lindsey and Amanda removed a stick from this interval that has been sent out for radiocarbon analysis. A date here will give a good estimate of when the region near Long Lake was deglaciated.
These laminated sediments represent the glacial-interglacial transition, which includes the glacial-Bolling-Allerod and Younger Dryas-Holocene transitions.
These laminated sediments represent the glacial-interglacial interval, which includes the Glacial-Bolling-Allerod and Younger Dryas-Holocene transitions.
The upper portions of the cre are primarily back, organic-rich muds with occasional loess layers - are these abrupt climate changes? The class is working on sorting all that out.
The upper portions of the core are primarily back, organic-rich muds with occasional loess layers – are these abrupt climate changes? The class is working on sorting all that out.
Rob and Bridgett picked this chironomid ffrom the 7th meter down in the core.
Rob and Bridgett picked this chironomid from the 7th meter down in the core.